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Chapter 37 - The USA National IPM Road Map

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2010

Edward B. Radcliffe
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
William D. Hutchison
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
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Summary

In 1994, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jointly announced an “IPM Initiative” with the goal of achieving adoption of IPM on 75% of planted cropland area in the USA by the end of 2000 (Jacobsen, 1996). Both the USDA and EPA indicated that an anticipated outcome of that level of IPM adoption would be a reduction in pesticide use on the nation's farms. In order to accomplish the goals of the initiative, a modest increase in funding was allocated for research, outreach and education by both the USDA and EPA.

A survey conducted by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) in 2000 indicated that growers adopting some level of IPM on farms had increased from around 50% at the beginning of the IPM Initiative to about 71% at the end of 2000 (National Agricultural Statistics Service, 2001). However, the anticipated reduction in pesticide use did not occur, and according to NASS surveys, pesticide use actually increased about 4% from 1994 to 2000 measured by quantity of active ingredient applied. In that same period, use of those pesticides considered most risky by EPA decreased by approximately 14%.

During 2000 and 2001, the US General Accounting Office (GAO) conducted a review of the IPM program. The review was sponsored by Senator Patrick J. Leahy of Vermont, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Research, Nutrition, and General Legislation of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

Type
Chapter
Information
Integrated Pest Management
Concepts, Tactics, Strategies and Case Studies
, pp. 471 - 478
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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References

Jacobsen, B. J. (1996). USDA Integrated Pest Management Initiative. In Radcliffe's IPM World Textbook, eds. Radcliffe, E. B. & Hutchison, W. D.. St. Paul, MN: University of Minnesota. Available at http://ipmworld.umn.edu.Google Scholar
,National Agricultural Statistics Service (2001). Pest Management Practices: 2000 Summary. Washington, DC: USDepartment of Agriculture. Available at http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/PestMana/PestMana-05-30-2001.txt.Google Scholar
,US General Accounting Office (2001). Agricultural Pesticides: Management Improvements Needed to Further Promote Integrated Pest Management, Report No. GAO-01–815. Washington, DC: USGeneral Accounting Office. Available at www.gao.gov/new.items/d01815.pdf.Google Scholar

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