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Chapter 24 - Insect management with physical methods in pre- and post-harvest situations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2010

Edward B. Radcliffe
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
William D. Hutchison
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
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Summary

In theory, IPM programs should be an optimal blend of science (knowledge) and technologies – used concomitantly or sequentially – to manage pests below an economic injury level. There are five main approaches available to achieve that goal: chemical control (synthetic and naturally derived), biological control (predators, parasitoids and pathogens), cultural control (including cover crops and genetically resistant plants), physical control and human factors (legal restrictions on commodities, quarantines, etc.) (Vincent et al., 2003). In practice, few technologies are blended into most pest management programs. For both pre- and post-harvest pest control, the primary approach worldwide is chemical/fumigation (Fields & White, 2002). Like any technology, chemical control has its merits and limits; the development of resistance to pesticides by some arthropod populations, environmental contamination and tightening of regulations in registration and restrictions of use are among factors that limit the use of chemical control measures. However, human factors are playing an effective role in movement towards truly integrated control programs. For example, there have been new regulations enacted in North America (US Food and Drug Administration, 2004) and the European Economic Community (European Union, 2002) for hygienic food quality and safety (Table 24.1). According to these new legislative measures, every food or feed product destined for trade must be free of arthropod pests. This requirement is the standard for food sanitary quality and hygiene of general application in international exchanges as established by the World Trade Organization (WTO).

Physical control methods have been used for millennia.

Type
Chapter
Information
Integrated Pest Management
Concepts, Tactics, Strategies and Case Studies
, pp. 309 - 323
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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