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Chapter 18 - Advances in breeding for host plant resistance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2010

Edward B. Radcliffe
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
William D. Hutchison
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
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Summary

Production of crop plants with heritable arthropod resistance traits has been recognized for more than 100 years as a sound approach to crop protection (Painter, 1951; Smith, 2005). Hundreds of arthropod-resistant crops are grown globally and represent the results of long-standing cooperative efforts of entomologists and plant breeders. These crops significantly improve world food production, increase producer profits and contribute to reduced insecticide use and residues in food crops (Smith, 2004).

It is essential to determine the inheritance of arthropod resistance genes. Plant breeders do so by observing progeny segregating from crosses between resistant and susceptible parents to determine the mode of inheritance and action of the resistance gene or genes. Breeding methods such as mass selection, pure line selection, recurrent selection, backcross breeding and pedigree breeding are often used to incorporate arthropod resistance genes into cultivars of such crops as maize, rapeseed, rice, wheat, potato, cotton and alfalfa (Smith, 2005). The focus of this chapter is on how the inheritance of resistance has been determined for the development of these crops and how new methods have been adapted in twentieth- and twenty-first-century plant breeding to select for arthropod resistance genes.

Inheritance of resistance

Khush & Brar (1991) and Gatehouse et al. (1994) have prepared extensive reviews on the inheritance of arthropod resistance in food and fiber crops.

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Integrated Pest Management
Concepts, Tactics, Strategies and Case Studies
, pp. 235 - 246
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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