Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-4btjb Total loading time: 1.623 Render date: 2022-05-28T21:24:54.499Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Book contents

Chapter 24 - Nonsurgical treatment of male infertility:

specific therapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2010

Larry I. Lipshultz
Affiliation:
Baylor College of Medicine
Stuart S. Howards
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Craig S. Niederberger
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Chicago
Get access

Summary

Many medications cause alterations in all categories of male infertility. Cimetidine, now an over-the-counter heartburn medication, suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in a reversible manner. Genitourinary infections in the male are an uncommon but potentially treatable source of infertility. Chlamydia trachomatis has long been studied as a putative disrupter of male fertility. Clomiphene citrate has been used since the early 1990s to stimulate spermatogenesis in the man with nonobstructive azoospermia. Kallmann syndrome is a rare subset of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) associated with other midline defects including anosmia. Another endocrine disorder, hyperprolactinemia, is also responsible for male infertility. Prolactin inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH) action on Leydig cells. Although the incidence of a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma is low, it is the most common functional pituitary tumor. Macroadenomas have warranted a referral to a neurosurgeon for transphenoidal or, more recently, endoscopic removal.
Type
Chapter
Information
Infertility in the Male , pp. 430 - 437
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×