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Chapter 26 - Abnormalities of ejaculation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2010

Larry I. Lipshultz
Affiliation:
Baylor College of Medicine
Stuart S. Howards
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Craig S. Niederberger
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Chicago
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Summary

Ejaculatory dysfunction obviously becomes important in the younger male when fatherhood is of concern but, even then, its role in fertility is often looked at only as a problem in transport of sperm. The organs involved in the process of ejaculation are the epididymides, vasa deferentia, prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder neck, and bulbourethral glands. Neural control of ejaculation consists of the ejaculatory reflex, which is mediated at the thoracolumbar level and involves a coordinated interaction of the sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous systems. Premature ejaculation and delayed ejaculation are the two conditions of importance. Men with a nerve-sparing retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) will have innervation of the ejaculatory organs, and the stimulation afforded by drug therapy may be enough to allow seminal emission or bladder neck closure. Penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) is usually recommended as the first line of treatment for anejaculation in men with spinal cord injury (SCI).
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Infertility in the Male , pp. 454 - 473
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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