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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2010

Aidan Feeney
Affiliation:
Durham University
Evan Heit
Affiliation:
University of California, Merced
Aidan Feeney
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Evan Heit
Affiliation:
University of Warwick
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Summary

Books on induction are rare; in fact, you are holding in your hands the first book devoted solely to the psychology of inductive reasoning in twenty years. And yet induction is a central topic in cognitive science, fundamental to learning, discovery, and prediction. We make inductive inferences every time we use what we already know to deal with novel situations. For example, wherever you found this book – in your university library, online, or in an academic bookshop – before picking it from the shelf or clicking on a link, you will have made some inductive inferences. Amongst other things, these inferences will have concerned the book's likely content given its title, its editors, its publisher, or its cover. Common to all of these inferences will have been the use of what you already know – about us, or the topic suggested by our title, or Cambridge University Press – to make predictions about the likely attributes of this book.

It is not only in publishers' catalogues that attention to induction has been scant. Despite its obvious centrality to an understanding of human cognition and behaviour, much less work has been carried out by psychologists on induction than on deduction, or logical reasoning. As a consequence, although there have been several edited collections of work on deduction and on decision making (Connolly, Arkes, & Hammond, 2000; Leighton & Sternberg, 2004; Gilovich, Griffin, & Kahneman, 2002; Manktelow & Chung, 2004), to the best of our knowledge there has never previously been an edited collection of papers on the psychology of inductive inference.

Type
Chapter
Information
Inductive Reasoning
Experimental, Developmental, and Computational Approaches
, pp. xiii - xx
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

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  • Preface
  • Edited by Aidan Feeney, University of Durham, Evan Heit, University of Warwick
  • Book: Inductive Reasoning
  • Online publication: 26 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511619304.001
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  • Preface
  • Edited by Aidan Feeney, University of Durham, Evan Heit, University of Warwick
  • Book: Inductive Reasoning
  • Online publication: 26 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511619304.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Edited by Aidan Feeney, University of Durham, Evan Heit, University of Warwick
  • Book: Inductive Reasoning
  • Online publication: 26 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511619304.001
Available formats
×