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Part III - New Party–Society Linkages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 January 2021

Diana Kapiszewski
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Steven Levitsky
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Deborah J. Yashar
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
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Print publication year: 2021

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References

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Author’s Interviews

Barrientos, Jaime. Valparaíso, Chile, Jan. 19, 2015.

Contreras, Leonardo. Valparaíso, Chile, Oct. 25, 2017.

Cooper, Alfred. Santiago, Chile, Jan. 20, 2015.

Durán Sepúlveda, Eduardo. Santiago, Chile, Oct. 27, 2017.

Gómez, Evelyn. Santiago, Chile, Oct. 25, 2017.

Larrondo, Abraham. Santiago, Chile, Jan. 15, 2015.

Muñoz, Francesca. Concepción, Chile, Jan. 14, 2015.

Muñoz, Héctor. Concepción, Chile, Jan. 14, 2015.

Pérez, Rosario. Valparaíso, Chile, Oct. 25, 2017.

Roldán, Eddy. Santiago, Chile, Oct. 23, 2017.

Soto, Emiliano. Santiago, Chile, Jan. 22, 2015.

Valenzuela, Samuel. Santiago, Jan. 19, 2015.

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