Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-797576ffbb-pxgks Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2023-12-08T19:00:31.139Z Has data issue: false Feature Flags: { "corePageComponentGetUserInfoFromSharedSession": true, "coreDisableEcommerce": false, "useRatesEcommerce": true } hasContentIssue false

Tropical semirings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2010

Get access

Summary

Introduction

It is a well-known fact that the boolean calculus is one of the mathematical foundations of electronic computers. This explains the important role of the boolean semiring in computer science. The aim of this paper is to present other semirings that occur in theoretical computer science. These semirings were named tropical semirings by Dominique Perrin in honour of the pioneering work of our Brazilian colleague and friend Imre Simon, but are also commonly known as (min, +)-semirings.

The aim of this paper is to present tropical semirings and to survey a few problems relevant to them. We shall try to give an updated status of the different questions, but detailed solutions of most problems would be too long and technical for this survey. They can be found in the other papers of this volume or in the relevant literature. We have tried to keep the paper selfcontained as much as possible. Thus, in principle, there are no prerequisites for reading this survey, apart from a standard mathematical background. However, it was clearly not possible to give a full exposition of the theory of automata within 20 pages. Therefore, suitable references will be given for readers who would like to pursue the subject further and join the tropical community.

The paper is organized as follows. The main definitions are introduced in Section 2. Two apparently disconnected applications of tropical semirings are presented: the Burnside type problems in group and semigroup theory in Section 3, and decidability problems in formal language theory in Section 4. The connection between the two problems is explained in Section 5. A conclusion section ends the paper.

Type
Chapter
Information
Idempotency , pp. 50 - 69
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×