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27 - Lower Premolar Cusp Number

from Part II - Crown and Root Trait Descriptions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2017

G. Richard Scott
Affiliation:
University of Nevada, Reno
Joel D. Irish
Affiliation:
Liverpool John Moores University
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
Human Tooth Crown and Root Morphology
The Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System
, pp. 161 - 166
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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Wood, B.A., and Uytterschaut, H. (1987). Analysis of the dental morphology of Plio-Pleistocene hominids. III Mandibular premolar crowns. Journal of Anatomy, 154, 121156.Google ScholarPubMed

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