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Part III - Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2017

G. Richard Scott
Affiliation:
University of Nevada, Reno
Joel D. Irish
Affiliation:
Liverpool John Moores University
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Human Tooth Crown and Root Morphology
The Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System
, pp. 249 - 264
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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  • Conclusions
  • G. Richard Scott, University of Nevada, Reno, Joel D. Irish, Liverpool John Moores University
  • Book: Human Tooth Crown and Root Morphology
  • Online publication: 21 April 2017
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316156629.045
Available formats
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  • Conclusions
  • G. Richard Scott, University of Nevada, Reno, Joel D. Irish, Liverpool John Moores University
  • Book: Human Tooth Crown and Root Morphology
  • Online publication: 21 April 2017
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316156629.045
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusions
  • G. Richard Scott, University of Nevada, Reno, Joel D. Irish, Liverpool John Moores University
  • Book: Human Tooth Crown and Root Morphology
  • Online publication: 21 April 2017
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316156629.045
Available formats
×