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Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Human Assisted Reproductive Technology
Future Trends in Laboratory and Clinical Practice
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Chapter 16 - Artificial gametes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 May 2011

David K. Gardner
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Botros R. M. B. Rizk
Affiliation:
University of South Alabama
Tommaso Falcone
Affiliation:
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
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Summary

This chapter reviews the relevant studies with human and animal cells aimed at the development of artificial gametes. During female gametogenesis (oogenesis), oogonia start the first meiotic division in the fetal period of life, but the process becomes arrested at a late prophase until puberty. Unlike oogenesis, male gametogenesis (spermatogenesis) is a continuous process in which spermatogonia enter meiosis and form primary spermatocytes. The chapter outlines the main methodological problems in artificial female and male gamete production, and suggests possible ways of their solution. As compared with mature oocytes, the use of germinal vesicle oocytes for somatic cell nucleus haploidization represents an even greater challenge because two steps of reduction are necessary. Experiments with the embryonic stem (ES) cells can help understand the mechanisms guiding the differentiation of stem cells towards the germline and thus prepare the route for the work with the adult stem (AS) cells.
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Human Assisted Reproductive Technology
Future Trends in Laboratory and Clinical Practice
, pp. 177 - 185
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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