Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-pftt2 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-20T12:01:57.727Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 17 - In Vitro Maturation

from Section 4 - Oocyte and Embryo Culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2019

Gabor Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
Anthony Rutherford
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
David K. Gardner
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Dahan, MH, Tan, SL, Chung, J, Son, WY Clinical definition paper on in vitro maturation of human oocytes. Hum Reprod. 2016;31(7): 1383–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walls, ML, Hunter, T, Ryan, JP et al. In vitro maturation as an alternative to standard in vitro fertilization for patients diagnosed with polycystic ovaries: a comparative analysis of fresh, frozen and cumulative cycle outcomes. Hum Reprod. 2015;30(1):8896.Google Scholar
Pincus, G, Enzmann, EV The comparative behavior of mammalian eggs in vivo and in vitro. The Journal of Experimental Medicine. 1935;62(5): 665–75.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Edwards, RG Maturation in vitro of mouse, sheep, cow, pig, rhesus monkey and human ovarian oocytes. Nature. 1965;208(5008): 349–51.Google Scholar
Cha, KY, Koo, JJ, Ko, JJ et al. Pregnancy after in vitro fertilization of human follicular oocytes collected from nonstimulated cycles, their culture in vitro and their transfer in a donor oocyte program. Fertility and Sterility. 1991;55(1):109.Google Scholar
Trounson, A, Wood, C, Kausche, A. In vitro maturation and the fertilization and developmental competence of oocytes recovered from untreated polycystic ovarian patients. Fertility and Sterility. 1994;62(2):353.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
De Vos, M, Ortega-Hrepich, C, Albuz, FK et al. Clinical outcome of non-hCG-primed oocyte in vitro maturation treatment in patients with polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome. Fertil Steril. 2011;96(4): 860–4.Google Scholar
Chian, RC, Buckett, WM, Too, LL, Tan, SL Pregnancies resulting from in vitro matured oocytes retrieved from patients with polycystic ovary syndrome after priming with human chorionic gonadotropin. Fertil Steril. 1999;72(4): 639–42.Google Scholar
Junk, SM, Yeap, D. Improved implantation and ongoing pregnancy rates after single-embryo transfer with an optimized protocol for in vitro oocyte maturation in women with polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome. Fertil Steril. 2012;98(4): 888–92.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walls, ML, Douglas, K, Ryan, JP, Tan, J, Hart, R. In-vitro maturation and cryopreservation of oocytes at the time of oophorectomy. Gynecologic Oncology Reports. 2015;13:7981.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Uzelac, PS, Delaney, AA, Christensen, GL, Bohler, HC, Nakajima, ST. Live birth following in vitro maturation of oocytes retrieved from extracorporeal ovarian tissue aspiration and embryo cryopreservation for 5 years. Fertil Steril. 2015;104(5): 1258–60.Google Scholar
Segers, I, Mateizel, I, Van Moer, E et al. In vitro maturation (IVM) of oocytes recovered from ovariectomy specimens in the laboratory: a promising “ex vivo” method of oocyte cryopreservation resulting in the first report of an ongoing pregnancy in Europe. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2015;32(8): 1221–31.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ross, C TK, Child, T, Davies, J, Becker, C, Fatum, M. Immature oocyte retrieval followed by in vitro maturation (IVM) and vitrification in combination with laparoscopic ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTCP) for fertility preservation: UK pilot study. Human Reproduction. 2016; 31(Supplement 1):i335.Google Scholar
Tang, H, Hunter, T, Hu, Y et al. Cabergoline for preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012(2):CD008605.Google Scholar
Walls, ML, Ryan, JP, Keelan, JA, Hart, R. In vitro maturation is associated with increased early embryo arrest without impairing morphokinetic development of useable embryos progressing to blastocysts. Hum Reprod. 2015;30(8): 1842–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Radesic, B, Tremellen, K. Oocyte maturation employing a GnRH agonist in combination with low-dose hCG luteal rescue minimizes the severity of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome while maintaining excellent pregnancy rates. Hum Reprod. 2011;26(12): 3437–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boothroyd, C, Karia, S, Andreadis, N et al.Consensus statement on prevention and detection of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2015;55(6): 523–34.Google Scholar
Oktay, K, Buyuk, E, Libertella, N, Akar, M, Rosenwaks, Z. Fertility preservation in breast cancer patients: a prospective controlled comparison of ovarian stimulation with tamoxifen and letrozole for embryo cryopreservation. J Clin Oncol. 2005;23(19): 4347–53.Google ScholarPubMed
Stopp, D, Cobo, A, Silber, S. Fertility preservation for age-related fertility decline. whilst maintaining the integrity of the oocyte. Lancet. 2014 October 4;384(9950): 1311–9.Google Scholar
Benard, J, Calvo, J, Comtet, M et al. Fertility preservation in women of the childbearing age: Indications and strategies. J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris). 2016;45(5): 424–44.Google Scholar
Huang, JY, Tulandi, T, Holzer, H et al. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue and in vitro matured oocytes in a female with mosaic Turner syndrome: Case Report. Hum Reprod. 2008;23(2): 336–9.Google Scholar
van Erven, B, Gubbels, CS, van Golde, RJ et al. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases. 2013;8:107.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prasath, EB, Chan, ML, Wong, WH et al. First pregnancy and live birth resulting from cryopreserved embryos obtained from in vitro matured oocytes after oophorectomy in an ovarian cancer patient. Hum Reprod. 2014;29(2): 276–8.Google Scholar
Mikkelsen, AL, Smith, SD, Lindenberg, S. In-vitro maturation of human oocytes from regularly menstruating women may be successful without follicle stimulating hormone priming. Human Reproduction. 1999;14(7): 1847–51.Google Scholar
Mikkelsen, A, Lindenberg, S. Benefit of FSH priming of women with PCOS to the in vitro maturation procedure and the outcome: a randomized prospective study. Reproduction. 2001;122(4): 587–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Junk, SM, Yeap, D. Improved implantation and ongoing pregnancy rates after single-embryo transfer with an optimized protocol for in vitro oocyte maturation in women with polycystic ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome. Fertility and Sterility. 2012;98(4): 888–92.Google Scholar
Zheng, X, Wang, L, Zhen, X et al. Effect of hCG priming on embryonic development of immature oocytes collected from unstimulated women with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2012;10:40.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×