Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ssw5r Total loading time: 0.916 Render date: 2022-08-16T02:43:14.690Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 5 - Immunological screening in women undergoing IVF

from Section 1 - Patient selection and preparation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2011

Gab Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
Get access

Summary

Recent studies have investigated the role of autoimmune factors in implantation in women undergoing fertility treatment. The most commonly studied antibodies include antiphospholipid antibodies (APA), antithyroid antibodies (ATA), antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antigliadin antibodies, antiovarian antibodies (AOA), and antisperm antibodies (ASA). Several published reports indicate that positive APA are found more frequently in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) or who have failed IVF. Although the prevalence of APA is higher among women undergoing IVF, their presence does not appear to influence the outcome of pregnancy, miscarriage, or live birth rate. Thrombophilias have been thought to cause a state of hypercoagulation at the implantation site impeding the connection between maternal and fetal blood flow, ultimately resulting in miscarriage. Screening for thrombophilias in women who are infertile or in those with implantation failure remains controversial and should not routinely be performed in women undergoing IVF.
Type
Chapter
Information
How to Improve your ART Success Rates
An Evidence-Based Review of Adjuncts to IVF
, pp. 22 - 27
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×