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Chapter 25 - Testosterone regulates Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis

from Section 5 - Testosterone, estradiol and men, and sex hormone binding globulin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Eef Hogervorst
Affiliation:
Loughborough University
Victor W. Henderson
Affiliation:
Stanford University, California
Robert B. Gibbs
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh
Roberta Diaz Brinton
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
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Summary

Editors' introduction

As aging is associated with decreased estradiol production in women, so is aging associated with decreased testosterone production in men. In this chapter, Pike and Rosario review novel and compelling data indicating testosterone regulation of β-amyloid production in the brain, as well as significant associations between low testosterone levels and risk for Alzheimer's-related dementia in men. Based on these data and on the various mechanisms by which testosterone can exert neuroprotective effects in brain, the authors conclude that low testosterone is a likely risk factor for Alzheimer's-related dementia in men. Their analysis points out the need for research focusing on the development of brain-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) for use in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in men.

Type
Chapter
Information
Hormones, Cognition and Dementia
State of the Art and Emergent Therapeutic Strategies
, pp. 242 - 250
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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