Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j5sqr Total loading time: 1.351 Render date: 2022-10-03T19:34:13.545Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Section 3 - Potential modulators and modifiers of estrogenic effects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Eef Hogervorst
Affiliation:
Loughborough University
Victor W. Henderson
Affiliation:
Stanford University, California
Robert B. Gibbs
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh
Roberta Diaz Brinton
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Get access

Summary

Editors' introduction

Estrogen-based therapies often include a progestin to antagonize tumorigenic effects of estrogens in the uterus. While much has been learned about the functional and neuroprotective effects of estrogens in the brain, far less is known about the effects of progestins, particularly specific progestins like progesterone and medroxy-progesterone acetate, used either alone or in combination with estrogenic therapies. In this chapter, Pike and Carroll review many of the effects on cell survival and function, first of estrogens, and then of progestins. While not all progestins are alike, the authors find that prolonged exposure to progestins often will decrease the protective effects of estradiol on cell survival and function. Evidence suggests that a cyclical regimen of estradiol and progesterone may be most efficacious. Ultimately, the development of neural selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) with the potential to circumvent the need for, and hence the negative neural consequences of, progesterone will be an important advance to estrogen-based therapies.

Type
Chapter
Information
Hormones, Cognition and Dementia
State of the Art and Emergent Therapeutic Strategies
, pp. 101 - 142
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×