Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-489z4 Total loading time: 0.749 Render date: 2022-05-25T23:38:20.269Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Chapter 6 - Belgium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2021

Andrew Bednarski
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Aidan Dodson
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Salima Ikram
Affiliation:
American University in Cairo
Get access

Summary

If one maintains a single perspective of Egyptology, we must acknowledge that the schism that occurred within the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (see pp. 19) was a blow to both sides. For the Dutch, the directors of the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (RMO) were forced to adapt to new economic realities (see p. 136). For them, the golden age of acquiring antiquities came to an abrupt end, even though the RMO’s collections continued to grow. For the Belgians, not only had Brussels lost any chance of one day hosting the great Egyptian museum promised to them, but also Leiden, with its collection of Egyptian antiquities, its university library and its Chair of Egyptology, lay in the now-separated northern part of the country, and would henceforth be Dutch. At a time when travel was rarely undertaken and when antiquities and reference books were few and exceedingly costly, Belgian savants found themselves, overnight, bereft of materials and instruction. The Belgian–Dutch divorce thus delayed the emergence of a specifically Belgian Egyptology: it remained to be seen if and how an independent Belgium could reverse the effects of this historical reality.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×