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Chapter 12 - Ovarian and Cervical Malignancy in Pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2023

Swati Jha
Affiliation:
Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
Priya Madhuvrata
Affiliation:
Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
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Summary

Cancer during pregnancy is rare, affecting approximately 1 in 1 000 pregnancies. Although rare, most obstetricians will at times be responsible for women who have a history of cancer, or present with symptoms or signs of possible malignancy during pregnancy, or even encounter a new diagnosis during a current pregnancy. Pregnancy itself does not predispose to cancer, but there may be delays in diagnosis due to symptoms being falsely attributed to physiological symptoms related to pregnancy.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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