Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-npwgr Total loading time: 0.489 Render date: 2023-02-08T08:39:58.133Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

24 - Pindar's Cycle

from PART III - THE FORTUNE OF THE EPIC CYCLE IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2015

Ian Rutherford
Affiliation:
University of Reading
Marco Fantuzzi
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Christos Tsagalis
Affiliation:
University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Get access

Summary

Overlaps between Pindar and Cyclic Epic

Most choral songs of the sort composed by Pindar included a narrative based on the established themes of Greek mythology (usually a unique one for each song), or at least brief mythological references. The subjects were most often ones belonging to Panhellenic or common-Greek traditions; ones of purely local interest and disconnected from Panhellenic tradition are rarer. Since the Trojan and Theban Cycle are primary repositories of such myths, it is no surprise to find that there are many overlaps between choral narratives and the Epic Cycle, as indeed there are with the Hesiodic Catalogue of Women. Obviously, an overlap does not in itself prove borrowing, or that Pindar knew the Cycle.

The Trojan Cycle is well represented in Pindar, particularly when he is composing for victors from Aegina, in whose mythology the Aeacidae play a major role. Overlaps with the Cypria include: the wedding of Thetis and Peleus; perhaps the infancy of Achilles, and his being raised by Cheiron; the conflict between the Dioscuri and the Apharetidae (see below); the battle with Telephus in Teuthrania during the first and abortive expedition, where the military cooperation between Achilles and Patroclus was first displayed; and Achilles’ slaying Cycnus the son of Poseidon early on in the war. Another striking overlap with the Cypria can also be found in the Odes of Bacchylides, whose short Ode 15 has as its subject the ‘Demand for Helen’ made by Menelaus and Odysseus, when they were protected by Antenor and Theaino. Overlaps between the Aethiopis and Pindar include the killing of Memnon, the mourning for Achilles, and his immortalization on the White Island. Here too belongs the suicide of Ajax, apparently dealt with in both Aethiopis and Ilias parva; a scholiast discussing Pindar's account of it at Isth. 4.35–9, and his specification that it happened ὀψίᾳ ἐν νυκτὶ, says that if this phrase means ‘in the last part of the night’, i.e. just before dawn, this is parallel to the account in the Aethiopis (PEG F 5 = F 1 D. = F 6 W.).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
5
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Pindar's Cycle
  • Edited by Marco Fantuzzi, Columbia University, New York, Christos Tsagalis, University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Book: The Greek Epic Cycle and its Ancient Reception
  • Online publication: 05 August 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511998409.026
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Pindar's Cycle
  • Edited by Marco Fantuzzi, Columbia University, New York, Christos Tsagalis, University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Book: The Greek Epic Cycle and its Ancient Reception
  • Online publication: 05 August 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511998409.026
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Pindar's Cycle
  • Edited by Marco Fantuzzi, Columbia University, New York, Christos Tsagalis, University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Book: The Greek Epic Cycle and its Ancient Reception
  • Online publication: 05 August 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511998409.026
Available formats
×