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Chapter 11 - Borrowing, Dialogue and Rejection

Intertextual Interfaces in the Late Bronze Age

from Part III - Difference

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2021

Adrian Kelly
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Christopher Metcalf
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Summary

This chapter engages explicitly with the challenges faced by any kind of comparative analysis: while the question of historical influence remains an attractive topic for discussion, we should explore the interpretative potential of differences, as opposed to the similarities on which comparative studies tend to focus. An appreciation of differences may help us to see how one culture may be ‘receptive’ to some aspects of other tradition, while blocking others, perhaps because they are not in line with its established norms. The discussion thus examines those aspects of Anatolian and Syrian Storm Gd mythology that, unlike the central elements of the Song of Emergence, seem not to have been adopted in early Greek sources, in particular the myth of the Storm God’s conflict with the Sea, and reflects on the likely reasons that explain this apparent ‘blocking’.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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