Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.557 Render date: 2021-10-19T07:10:36.627Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Summary for Policy Makers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

Thomas B. Johansson
Affiliation:
Lund University
Nebojsa Nakicenovic
Affiliation:
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis and Vienna University of Technology
Anand Patwardhan
Affiliation:
Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay)
Luis Gomez-Echeverri
Affiliation:
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
Rangan Banerjee
Affiliation:
Indian Institute of Technology
Sally M. Benson
Affiliation:
Stanford University
Daniel H. Bouille
Affiliation:
Bariloche Foundation
Abeeku Brew-Hammond
Affiliation:
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
Aleh Cherp
Affiliation:
Central European University
Suani T. Coelho
Affiliation:
National Reference Center on Biomass, University of São Paulo
Lisa Emberson
Affiliation:
Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York
Maria Josefina Figueroa
Affiliation:
Technical University
Arnulf Grubler
Affiliation:
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria and Yale University
Kebin He
Affiliation:
Tsinghua University
Mark Jaccard
Affiliation:
Simon Fraser University
Suzana Kahn Ribeiro
Affiliation:
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Stephen Karekezi
Affiliation:
AFREPREN/FWD
Eric D. Larson
Affiliation:
Princeton University and Climate Central
Zheng Li
Affiliation:
Tsinghua University
Susan McDade
Affiliation:
United Nations Development Programme)
Lynn K. Mytelka
Affiliation:
United Nations University-MERIT
Shonali Pachauri
Affiliation:
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
Keywan Riahi
Affiliation:
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
Johan Rockström
Affiliation:
Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm University
Hans-Holger Rogner
Affiliation:
International Atomic Energy Agency
Joyashree Roy
Affiliation:
Jadavpur University
Robert N. Schock
Affiliation:
World Energy Council, UK and Center for Global Security Research
Ralph Sims
Affiliation:
Massey University
Kirk R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of California
Wim C. Turkenburg
Affiliation:
Utrecht University
Diana Ürge-Vorsatz
Affiliation:
Central European University
Frank von Hippel
Affiliation:
Princeton University
Kurt Yeager
Affiliation:
Electric Power Research Institute and Galvin Electricity Initiative
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Energy is essential for human development and energy systems are a crucial entry point for addressing the most pressing global challenges of the 21st century, including sustainable economic and social development, poverty eradication, adequate food production and food security, health for all, climate protection, conservation of ecosystems, peace and security. Yet, more than a decade into the 21st century, current energy systems do not meet these challenges.

A major transformation is therefore required to address these challenges and to avoid potentially catastrophic future consequences for human and planetary systems. The Global Energy Assessment (GEA) demonstrates that energy system change is the key for addressing and resolving these challenges. The GEA identifies strategies that could help resolve the multiple challenges simultaneously and bring multiple benefits. Their successful implementation requires determined, sustained and immediate action.

Transformative change in the energy system may not be internally generated; due to institutional inertia, incumbency and lack of capacity and agility of existing organizations to respond effectively to changing conditions. In such situations clear and consistent external policy signals may be required to initiate and sustain the transformative change needed to meet the sustainability challenges of the 21st century.

The industrial revolution catapulted humanity onto an explosive development path, whereby, reliance on muscle power and traditional biomass was replaced mostly by fossil fuels. In 2005, some 78% of global energy was based on fossil energy sources that provided abundant and ever cheaper energy services to more than half the people in the world.

Type
Chapter
Information
Global Energy Assessment
Toward a Sustainable Future
, pp. 3 - 30
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×