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Conclusion: How Might School Systems Use Genetic Data?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2017

Susan Bouregy
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Elena L. Grigorenko
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Stephen R. Latham
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
Mei Tan
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Houston
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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Murphy, S. (2016, November 16). Oklahoma voters reject sales tax hike for public education. Lincoln Journal Star. Retrieved from http://journalstar.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/oklahoma-voters-reject-sales-tax-hike-for-public-education/article_0b3a7876-ffde-545f-bf39-a4f913399539.html.Google Scholar
Natoli, J. L., Ackerman, D. L., McDermott, S., & Edwards, J. G. (2012). Prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome: A systematic review of termination rates (1995–2011). Prenat Diagn, 32, 142153.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Plomin, R., DeFries, J. C., Knopik, V. S. A., & Neiderhiser, J. M. (2016). Top 10 replicated findings from behavioral genetics. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11(1), 323.Google Scholar
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