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Part I - The Critique of Reason: Debates on Rationalism, Empiricism, and Skepticism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2023

Alexander J. B. Hampton
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
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Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi and the Ends of the Enlightenment
Religion, Philosophy, and Reason at the Crux of Modernity
, pp. 7 - 84
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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