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Chapter 11 - Persistent Features in the English of German Speakers

from III - Domains and Features of English

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 November 2019

Raymond Hickey
Affiliation:
Universität Duisburg–Essen
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Summary

In this chapter a range of features will be discussed which are persistent in the pronunciation of second-language German speakers of English. The majority of these features can be traced to structural influence from German, and hence it is worthwhile asking the question whether, in their cumulative effect, the features constitute a second-language variety in its own right which could be labelled ‘German English’. The use of this two-word label would imply that this form of English was comparable with native-language varieties like New Zealand English or Canadian English. After a detailed presentation of the various features this issue will be re-addressed and further discussed below.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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