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4 - Loving Strangers in Ireland

Indo-Celtic Masculinities in the Travels of Dean Mahomet and Mirza Abu Talib Khan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 November 2020

Humberto Garcia
Affiliation:
University of California, Merced
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Summary

The fourth chapter argues that Dean Mahomet’s English memoir, The Travels (1793), and Abu Taleb Khan’s Persian travelogue, Masir-i Talibi-fi-Bilad-i-Afranji [“Travels of Talib in the Lands of the Franks”], are bookend ruminations on Ireland before and after the 1798 revolt. Their ambivalent feelings about war are implicated in the dense web of social relations that link India to Ireland. I first examine Mahomet’s account of the 1781 British capture of the Rajah of Benares Chayt Singh, as mediated by newspaper reports about Irish MP Edmund Burke’s condemnation of unmanly colonial abuses in India during the Hastings impeachment trial (1788–1796).Then I discuss Abu Taleb’s reaction to the 1799 British defeat of the sultan of Mysore Tipu Sultan, as celebrated in the Dublin circus production of Philip Astley’s The Siege and Storming of Seringapatam. These writers’ patriotic responses to the theatrics of power imply a kinship with Irish hosts who, in their minds, belong to an Indo-Celtic Eurasia.

Type
Chapter
Information
England Re-Oriented
How Central and South Asian Travelers Imagined the West, 1750–1857
, pp. 123 - 169
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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