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Epilogue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 July 2022

Karin Krause
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
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Summary

On the first Sunday of Lent in 843, the restoration of the cult of icons was publicly proclaimed in Constantinople by the newly elected Patriarch Methodius. Iconoclasm was condemned as a heresy, joining the numerous other forms of declared religious error that had been anathematized over the centuries. In the following year, the reinstitution of icons was commemorated for the first time in a feast that the Eastern Orthodox Church celebrates to this day as the “Sunday of Orthodoxy” or “The Triumph of Orthodoxy.” Significantly, this festival not only commemorates the reinstitution of icons, but serves as an occasion for the public condemnation of all heresies. In the eleventh century, the historian Michael Attaleiates commented that on the first Sunday of Lent, “The Church is wont to separate the orthodox from the heretics and anathematize the heterodox.” The feast thus commemorates the triumph of the “true religion”; indeed, it was regarded by some as a celebration of the very birth of orthodoxy.

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Chapter
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Divine Inspiration in Byzantium
Notions of Authenticity in Art and Theology
, pp. 355 - 359
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Epilogue
  • Karin Krause, University of Chicago
  • Book: Divine Inspiration in Byzantium
  • Online publication: 16 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108922050.009
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  • Epilogue
  • Karin Krause, University of Chicago
  • Book: Divine Inspiration in Byzantium
  • Online publication: 16 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108922050.009
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Epilogue
  • Karin Krause, University of Chicago
  • Book: Divine Inspiration in Byzantium
  • Online publication: 16 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108922050.009
Available formats
×