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12 - What Governs Speakers’ Choices of Borrowed vs. Domestic Variants of Discourse-Pragmatic Variables?

from Part III - Language Contact Settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2022

Elizabeth Peterson
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Turo Hiltunen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Joseph Kern
Affiliation:
University of Virginia’s College at Wise
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Summary

English exerts a major influence on other languages, and borrowing is a significant product of language contact. This includes the borrowing of discourse–pragmatic items such as politeness formulas, greetings, expletives, and so on (Andersen 2014; Andersen 2017; Peterson 2017; Terkourafi 2009). This chapter considers two English–based forms that are used as discourse–pragmatic items in Norwegian alongside domestic alternatives with the same function. This includes please, used in requests alongside the domestic variant vær så snill, and sorry used in apologies alongside unnskyld and beklager. Individual corpus tokens are assessed for their illocutionary force, with a view to exploring the pragmatic conditioning of speakers’ choices of borrowed versus domestic forms. It is shown that the English forms are not replacing their domestic equivalents, but the data show signs of a division of labor and there are contexts where only one variant form is allowed. The study is based on four different corpora of spoken Norwegian: Ungdomsspråk i Norden (UNO), Norsk talemålskorpus (NoTa), the Big Brother corpus and the Scandinavian Dialect Corpus.

Type
Chapter
Information
Discourse-Pragmatic Variation and Change
Theory, Innovations, Contact
, pp. 251 - 271
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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