Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-vvt5l Total loading time: 0.28 Render date: 2022-06-30T20:47:00.268Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

10 - Culture and Cognition in Developmental Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2009

Glen H. Elder
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Elizabeth Jane Costello
Affiliation:
Duke University, North Carolina
Get access

Summary

In this chapter we focus on the relation between culture and cognition from a developmental perspective, emphasizing learning to read as a way of illustrating the co-constructive nature of development. The ideas expressed in the previous chapters have provided the perfect context within which to provide a developmental approach to this issue. Magnusson and Cairns's first proposition stated, “An individual develops and functions psychologically as an integrated organism. Maturational, experiential, and cultural contributions are fused in ontogeny. Single aspects do not develop and function in isolation, and they should not be divorced from the totality in analysis” (Magnusson & Cairns, Chap. 2). This proposition was illustrated nicely by Gottlieb (Chap. 4), who focused primarily on interactions (or coactions) at the genetic level, but persuasively argued that human functioning cannot be understood without consideration of the complexity of interactions at all levels, from the cellular to the cultural.

In fact, many of the points raised by Gottlieb with reference to geneticorganismic interaction would apply equally to the relation between individuals and culture. For example, his statements, “Genetic activity (expression) can be influenced by events inside and outside the cell, including the environment of the organism” and “Considerable morphological and behavioral ‘evolution’ can occur without changing the genetic composition of an interbreeding population,” could with little difficulty be rewritten to account for the development of individuals in cultures, including change from within the culture and without.

Type
Chapter
Information
Developmental Science , pp. 190 - 222
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1996

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
6
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×