Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-6zkrn Total loading time: 0.287 Render date: 2023-02-04T06:32:13.715Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

9 - Modes of Orientalism in Hungarian Letters and Learning of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2013

James Hodkinson
Affiliation:
Associate Professor in German Studies at Warwick University.
John Walker
Affiliation:
Senior Lecturer in European Cultures and Languages at Birkbeck College, University of London.
Shaswati Mazumdar
Affiliation:
Professor in German at the University of Delhi.
Johannes Feichtinger
Affiliation:
Researcher at the Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften.
Get access

Summary

This chapter charts the varied and changing uses of orientalist material and strategies in Hungarian culture over four distinct periods, two in the nineteenth century (1800–1850, 1850–1900) and two roughly corresponding to the two halves of the twentieth century. In the romantic period in Hungarian letters, the Orient was used for the systematic mobilization of the relevant “cultural artifacts” to highlight the “specificity” of Hungary, its differences from other European nations, and the alleged mission of the Hungarian nation in Europe. Hungary had been a part of the Habsburg monarchy from the eighteenth century, and the Habsburg monarchy provided a special framework for the collaboration of the Hungarian aristocracy in the court and in the administration. In spite of this association, the emphasis within much of the writing considered here was on features that distinguished Hungarian from Austrian and German culture, stressing the specificity of Hungarian language and folklore. The Orient that was demarcated in Hungarian letters and learning was a fluctuating concept and its shifting geographical location and parameters adapted to the political, social, and historical concerns of the day. Several tropes and formulations from earlier periods continued in orientalist discourse in these two centuries of Hungarian engagement with the Orient. In the initial two phases the link to Hungarian nationalism is the most significant feature. Traces of this are still visible in contemporary, nonacademic, populist engagement with Hungarian prehistory (before Hungarians occupied the territory of the Carpathian Basin, present-day Hungary, in AD 986) and its relationship to the Orient.

Type
Chapter
Information
Deploying Orientalism in Culture and History
From Germany to Central and Eastern Europe
, pp. 166 - 189
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×