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Chapter 14 - Economics of Decriminalizing Mental Illness: When Doing the Right Thing Costs Less

from Part II - Solutions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2021

Katherine Warburton
Affiliation:
University of California, Davis
Stephen M. Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
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Summary

U.S. health care costs are staggering, with spending at $3.5 trillion dollars in 2017. Additionally, criminal justice system expenditures are estimated at $270 billion dollars. Our nation’s most at-risk individuals are falling through the cracks and entering a vicious cycle of incarceration and temporary institutionalization, which only exacerbates these costs.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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