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Chapter 18 - How Did the Mycenaeans Remember? Death, Matter, and Memory in the Early Mycenaean World

from Part V - Materiality and Memory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2015

Colin Renfrew
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Michael J. Boyd
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Iain Morley
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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