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Chapter 2 - Indications

from Part I - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2024

Neville M. Jadeja
Affiliation:
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Kyle C. Rossi
Affiliation:
University of Massachusetts Medical School
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Summary

The most important indication for electroencephalography (EEG) in critically ill patients is to evaluate fluctuating or persistently abnormal mental status (or other focal neurological deficits) that cannot otherwise be explained. Commonly, these symptoms are a manifestation of physiological diffuse cerebral dysfunction (encephalopathy), or they may be due to seizure activity without apparent clinical manifestations. Such “nonconvulsive” seizures (NCS), that may only be detected by EEG, occur in at least 8–10% of critically ill patients. Continuous or frequent NCS is called nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE), and may result in secondary neurological injury, including neuronal death or alteration of neuronal networks. Left untreated, NCSE can become increasingly refractory to treatment. EEGs may be indicated in acute brain injury to detect seizure activity. They are useful in monitoring the depth of anesthesia and in the management of refractory status epilepticus. EEGs may also be used in the intensive care unit to characterize paroxysmal clinical events and in prognostication after cardiac arrest or determining brain death.

Type
Chapter
Information
Critical Care EEG Basics
Rapid Bedside EEG Reading for Acute Care Providers
, pp. 17 - 23
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2024

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References

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  • Indications
  • Neville M. Jadeja, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Kyle C. Rossi, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Book: Critical Care EEG Basics
  • Online publication: 22 February 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009261159.005
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Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Indications
  • Neville M. Jadeja, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Kyle C. Rossi, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Book: Critical Care EEG Basics
  • Online publication: 22 February 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009261159.005
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Indications
  • Neville M. Jadeja, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Kyle C. Rossi, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Book: Critical Care EEG Basics
  • Online publication: 22 February 2024
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009261159.005
Available formats
×