Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-rq46b Total loading time: 0.301 Render date: 2022-12-03T07:32:20.663Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Some concluding remarks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2022

Iain Ferguson
Affiliation:
University of New South Wales
Get access

Summary

Mark Lymbery starts his response to our lead article by noting that:

It would require a breathtaking combination of naivety and gullibility to deny the central point of Ferguson and Lavalette's argument: there is indeed a crisis in adult social care in the early years of the 21st century.

Each of our respondents has added flesh to our assertion and each has enriched the argument by making clear the depth of the crisis we now face. This is particularly powerful given the range of backgrounds each comes from.

The contributions by Claire Cairns and Brian Smith remind us that, whilst the precise details of adult social care practices differ across the different UK jurisdictions, the cuts are exposing a huge gap between the policy rhetoric and the reality as implemented through practice. The two Glasgow case studies provide detailed coverage of the impact of the cuts on social care budgets on the front-line and of their impact on workers, service users and carers. For these reasons alone, the contributions from both respondents will resonate with people across the UK – and, indeed, across much of the Eurozone where austerity measures are being implemented and front-line services being left exposed and underfunded.

As Smith declares, we need to oppose a logic which argues that ‘some people must get less, in order that others will get something’. This is a position which finds us all scrambling and fighting against each other for a few meagre crumbs, when the reality is that, even in these so-called austere times, the cake is big enough to feed all those in need: the Sunday Times Rich List for 2012 showed that, despite the crisis, the wealthiest 1,000 people in Britain have seen their wealth soar to record levels and now stands at a combined total of £414.260 billion (http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/nation/sunday-timesrich- list/).

Mark Lymbery adds important reflection and detail to our case. He starts with the moves towards community care in the late 1980s. His point that the rhetoric of the community care policy initiatives was able to gain wide support because it embodied an implicit critique of the existing paternalistic provision, often situated in large, depersonalised institutions, is well made.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Bristol University Press
First published in: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×