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5 - Crimes of Endangerment

from Part I - Criminal Law

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2022

Kai Ambos
Affiliation:
Judge Kosovo Specialist Chambers, The Hague
Antony Duff
Affiliation:
University of Stirling
Alexander Heinze
Affiliation:
Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen, Germany
Julian Roberts
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Thomas Weigend
Affiliation:
University of Cologne (Emeritus)
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Summary

Criminal laws typically contain a wide variety of offences that target dangerous behaviour. Our goal in this chapter is to compare the ways in which German and English criminal law deal with these kinds of offence; to clarify some distinctions that need to be drawn (and that can be discerned, more or less explicitly, in existing laws) if we are to understand the logic and rationale of such offences; and to note some of the normative issues that such offences raise. To that end, we begin (in section II) by distinguishing endangerment offences in a narrower sense from another important category of dangerous conduct without harmful outcome, that is, attempts. If one speaks of endangerment in a wider sense, attempts would fall into this category, but we will limit our analysis to endangerment offences in the narrower sense.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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