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3 - Long-tailed tits: Ecological causes and fitness consequences of redirected helping

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2015

Walter D. Koenig
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
Janis L. Dickinson
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
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Cooperative Breeding in Vertebrates
Studies of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
, pp. 39 - 57
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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