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17 - Malesterilization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2013

Edited by
Edited in consultation with
Paula Briggs
Affiliation:
Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust
Gabor Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
John Guillebaud
Affiliation:
University College London
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Summary

Apart from the use of condoms, vasectomy is the only method of birth control that is the responsibility of the man. Vasectomy is more cost effective, less invasive and has a lower failure rate than sterilization in women. The general practitioner (GP) plays a very important role when a couple or an individual consults them about a vasectomy referral. Bearing in mind the poor pregnancy rate of vasectomy reversal and the potential cost, some men may want to have information about sperm storage. Cryo-storage would allow artificial insemination of their current partner or of a new partner. Vasectomy operative techniques described in this chapter include: open-ended vasectomy, fascial imposition, and Pro-Vas. The chapter explains that the man may experience a small amount of pain and discomfort during and after the procedure and that usually paracetamol is sufficient for pain relief.
Type
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Information
Contraception
A Casebook from Menarche to Menopause
, pp. 149 - 158
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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