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Case 8 - “This Is Not Like Him”

from Part 2 - Misidentifying the Impaired Cognitive Domain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

Missatributing symptoms to already established conditions often represents a missed opportunity to improve management. These cases provide some examples.

Type
Chapter
Information
Common Pitfalls in Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 24 - 26
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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Williams, D. R., Warren, J. D. and Lees, A. J. 2008. Using the presence of visual hallucinations to differentiate Parkinson’s disease from atypical parkinsonism. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 79(6) 652655.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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