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Case 4 - No Need to Worry: Your Neuropsychological Evaluation Was Normal

from Part 1 - Missing the Diagnosis Altogether

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

Even when an accurate history and a comprehensive exam are obtained, putting the pieces together can be challenging. Here, we present cases of failures in pattern recognition.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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