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Case 27 - Moving without Thinking

from Part 6 - Clinical Findings That Are Subtle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

This 44-year-old right-handed woman with 12 years of education presented to the clinic with behavioral changes in the context of abnormal movements. Her husband noticed she became emotionally distant and withdrawn three years prior. Around the same time, she exhibited restlessness and continual movements in her hands, which later spread to her whole body. She was initially thought to be depressed and treated with sertraline (titrated up to 200 mg a day) with no benefit. Within a year of symptom onset, impulsive, inappropriate behaviors emerged (e.g., making comments about other people in public and eating from her husband’s plate), accompanied by some delusional thoughts (e.g., thinking her family was trying to hurt her and the government was spying on her).

Type
Chapter
Information
Common Pitfalls in Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 87 - 88
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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