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Case 47 - Is It Still Helping?

from Part 10 - Management Misadventures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

This 76-year-old man returned to the clinic, brought by his daughter for monitoring of his progressive memory impairment. Five years previously, neuropsychological evaluation revealed memory encoding deficits and brain MRI showed asymmetric hippocampal atrophy. With a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer disease, he was started on rivastigmine, gradually increased to a dose of 6 mg BID. The family noticed better thinking and less forgetfulness for six months, but he continued to decline thereafter. He went on to have difficulty dressing and bathing and experienced delusions of theft. After five years of treatment with rivastigmine, his daughter wondered if it should be discontinued.

Type
Chapter
Information
Common Pitfalls in Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 153 - 154
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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