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Case 2 - Cognitive Decline Is Only Part of the Story

from Part 1 - Missing the Diagnosis Altogether

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

Most cognitive changes are usually described as problems with memory. These cases are an example of the importance of identifying what cognitive process is afffected in order to improve diagnosis and management.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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