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Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2009

Roger S. Pulwarty
Affiliation:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado
Henry F. Diaz
Affiliation:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, District of Columbia
Richard J. Murnane
Affiliation:
Bermuda Biological Station for Research, Garrett Park, Maryland
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Summary

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) definition of climate change refers to any change in climate over time, whether it is due to natural variability or is a result of human activity. Climate and non-climatic factors interact to produce both opportunities and disasters. It is the goal of good adaptation practices to take advantage of such opportunities and to reduce associated risks. There are substantial vulnerabilities to hurricanes along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. The major concentrations of vulnerable economic activity and capital (with capital stock greater than US$100 billion) are located in areas affected by hurricanes, including the coastal cities of Miami, New Orleans, Houston, and Tampa, three of which have been hit by major storms in the past 15 years. The year 2005 was an economic outlier because the cost per unit of hurricane power was high, but not because the power was extraordinarily high.

Adaptation to climate change must account for a variety of timescales if it is to be effectively embedded into development plans. In any event, a more robust formulation for integrating disaster risks into sustainable development is important in an uncertain and changing environment. Key informational needs for mainstreaming climate change and adaptation into development plans include knowledge of the spatial and temporal characteristics of climatic extremes and the integration of loss estimates with projections of such extremes.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Foreword
    • By Roger S. Pulwarty, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado
  • Edited by Henry F. Diaz, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, District of Columbia, Richard J. Murnane
  • Book: Climate Extremes and Society
  • Online publication: 14 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511535840.001
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  • Foreword
    • By Roger S. Pulwarty, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado
  • Edited by Henry F. Diaz, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, District of Columbia, Richard J. Murnane
  • Book: Climate Extremes and Society
  • Online publication: 14 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511535840.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Foreword
    • By Roger S. Pulwarty, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado
  • Edited by Henry F. Diaz, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, District of Columbia, Richard J. Murnane
  • Book: Climate Extremes and Society
  • Online publication: 14 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511535840.001
Available formats
×