Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-bmzkg Total loading time: 0.933 Render date: 2022-07-04T07:11:20.017Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

14 - The Scientific Revolution

from Part III - Reformation, Renaissance, Enlightenment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 September 2021

Michael Ruse
Affiliation:
Florida State University
Stephen Bullivant
Affiliation:
St Mary's University, Twickenham, London
Get access

Summary

The Scientific Revolution is conveniently dated from 1543, when the Polish astronomer Nicolas Copernicus published his De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres), in which he argued that the Earth goes around the Sun rather than the Sun around the Earth – the “heliocentric” picture of the universe from the “geocentric” picture of the universe (Kuhn 1957). It is as conveniently dated to 1687, when the English mathematician and physicist Isaac Newton published Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) which, thanks to his three laws of motion and his law of gravitational attraction, gave the all-important causal explanation to what the Revolution had wrought (Westfall 1971, 1980)

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Aquinas, St. T. 1981. Summa Theologica, trans. Fathers of the English Dominican Province. London: Christian Classics.Google Scholar
Bacon, F. 1868 [1605]. The Advancement of Learning. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
Bergson, H. 1907. L’évolution créatrice. Paris: Alcan.Google Scholar
Boyle, R. 1966 [1688]. “A disquisition about the final causes of natural things.” In The Works of Robert Boyle, vol. 5, ed. Birch, T.. Hildesheim: Georg Olms, 392444.Google Scholar
Boyle, R. 1996 [1686]. A Free Enquiry into the Vulgarly Received Notion of Nature, ed. Davis, E. B. and Hunter, M.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Browne, J. 1995. Charles Darwin: Voyaging. Volume 1 of a Biography. London: Jonathan Cape.Google Scholar
Browne, J. 2002. Charles Darwin: The Power of Place. Volume 2 of a Biography. London: Jonathan Cape.Google Scholar
Cooper, J. M. (ed.) 1997. Plato: Complete Works. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.Google Scholar
Coyne, J. A. 2015. Faith Versus Fact: Why Science and Religion Are Incompatible. New York: Viking.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. 1859. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. London: John Murray.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. 1958. The Autobiography of Charles Darwin 1809–1882. With the Original Omissions Restored. Edited and with Appendix and Notes by His Grand-Daughter Nora Barlow. London: Collins.Google Scholar
Darwin, C. 1985. The Correspondence of Charles Darwin. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Davies, B., and Ruse, M. 2021. Taking God Seriously. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dawkins, R. 1986. The Blind Watchmaker. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
Descartes, R. 1964 [1637]. “Discourse on method,” in Philosophical Essays. Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill, 157.Google Scholar
Descartes, R. 1955 [1644]. “The principles of philosophy,” in The Philosophical Works of Descartes, vol. 1, trans. E. Haldane, and G. R. T. Ross. New York: Dover, 201302.Google Scholar
Diderot, D. 1972 [1796]. The Nun. London: Penguin.Google Scholar
Dijksterhuis, E. J. 1961. The Mechanization of the World Picture. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Frost, R. 1931. Education by poetry: a meditative monologue. Amherst Graduates’ Quarterly 20, 7585.Google Scholar
Hume, D. 1963 [1779]. “Dialogues concerning natural religion,” in Hume on Religion, ed. Wollheim, R.. London: Fontana, 93204.Google Scholar
Kant, I. 2000 [1790]. Critique of the Power of Judgment, ed. Guyer, P.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kepler, J. 1977 [1619]. The Harmony of the World, trans. E. J. Aiton, A. M. Duncan, and J. V. Field. Philadelphia, PA: American Philosophical Society.Google Scholar
Kuhn, T. 1957. The Copernican Revolution. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Lennox, J. G. 1993. Darwin was a teleologist. Biology and Philosophy 8, 409–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newman, J. H. 1973. The Letters and Diaries of John Henry Newman, XXV, ed. Dessain, C. S. and Gornall, T.. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
Paley, W. 1819 [1802]. Natural Theology (Collected Works: IV). London: Rivington.Google Scholar
Richards, R. J. and Ruse, M. 2016. Debating Darwin. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruse, M. 2013. The Gaia Hypothesis: Science on a Pagan Planet. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruse, M. 2015. Atheism: What Everyone Needs to Know. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruse, M. 2017. On Purpose. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ruse, M. 2019. The Darwinian Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sartre, J.-P. 1977 [1948]. Existentialism and Humanism. Brooklyn, NY: Haskell House Publishers.Google Scholar
Spinoza, B. 1677. Tractatus Theologico-Politicus. Amsterdam: Jan Rieuwertsz.Google Scholar
Tindal, M. 1732. Christianity as Old as the Creation: or, the Gospel, a Republication of the Religion of Nature. London: NP.Google Scholar
Westfall, R. S. 1971. The Construction of Modern Science: Mechanisms and Mechanics. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Westfall, R. S. 1980. Never at Rest: A Biography of Isaac Newton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×