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Part V - Classical Modernity: Social and Political Currents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 September 2021

Michael Ruse
Affiliation:
Florida State University
Stephen Bullivant
Affiliation:
St Mary's University, Twickenham, London
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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