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80 - Stress and Burnout in Doctors

from Theme 2: - Health Care Professionals’ Wellbeing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2019

Carrie D. Llewellyn
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
Susan Ayers
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Chris McManus
Affiliation:
University College London
Stanton Newman
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Keith J. Petrie
Affiliation:
University of Auckland
Tracey A. Revenson
Affiliation:
City University of New York
John Weinman
Affiliation:
King's College London
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Brooks, S. K., Gerada, C. & Chalder, T. (2011). Review of literature on the mental health of doctors: are specialist services needed? Journal of Mental Health, 2(146), 156.Google Scholar
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Kinman, G. & Jones, F. (2005). Lay representations of workplace stress: what do people really mean when they say they are stressed? Work & Stress, 19(2), 101120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maslach, C., Jackson, S. E. & Leiter, M. P. (1996). Maslach Burnout Inventory (3rd edn). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.Google Scholar
McManus, I. C., Winder, B. C. & Gordon, D. (2002). The causal links between stress and burnout in a longitudinal study of UK doctors. Lancet, 359, 20892090.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McManus, I. C., Keeling, A. & Paice, E. (2004). Stress, burnout and doctors’ attitudes to work are determined by personality and learning style: a twelve year longitudinal study of UK medical graduates. BMC Medicine, 2, 29.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McManus, I. C., Jonvik, H., Richards, P. & Paice, E. (2011). Vocation and avocation: leisure activities correlate with professional engagement, but not burnout, in a cross-sectional study of UK doctors. BMC Medicine, 9, 100. www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/9/100.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). (1999). Stress ... at Work. Cincinatti, OH: US Department of Health and Human Services. www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/99-101.Google Scholar
Schaufeli, W. B., Bakker, A., Hoogduin, K., Schaap, C. & Kladler, A. (2001). On the clinical validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the burnout measure. Psychology and Health, 16, 565582.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schaufeli, W. B., Leiter, M. P. & Maslach, C. (2009). Burnout: 35 years of research and practice. Career Development International, 14(3), 204220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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