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Section 1 - Prevention and Screening

from Part II - Medical Topics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2019

Carrie D. Llewellyn
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
Susan Ayers
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Chris McManus
Affiliation:
University College London
Stanton Newman
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Keith J. Petrie
Affiliation:
University of Auckland
Tracey A. Revenson
Affiliation:
City University of New York
John Weinman
Affiliation:
King's College London
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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