Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-b2czv Total loading time: 2.585 Render date: 2022-06-26T07:55:20.802Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Part VI - Social and Cultural Processes: Personality at the Intersection of Society

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Philip J. Corr
Affiliation:
City, University London
Gerald Matthews
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Adler, J. M., Dunlop, W. L., Fivush, R., Lilgendahl, J. P., Lodi-Smith, J., McAdams, D. P., … Syed, M. (2017). Research methods for studying narrative identity: A primer. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 8, 519527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benet-Martinez, V., & Haritatos, J. (2005). Bicultural Identity Integration (BII): Components, dynamics, and psychosocial correlates. Journal of Personality, 73, 10151050.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bird, A., & Reese, E. (2006). Emotional reminiscing and the development of an autobiographical self. Developmental Psychology, 42, 613626.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Block, J. (1981). The many faces of continuity. Contemporary Psychology, 26, 748750.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bluck, S., & Alea, N. (2009). Thinking and talking about the past: Why remember? Applied Cognitive Psychology, 23, 10891104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Costa, P. T., & McCrae, R. R. (1980). Influence of extraversion and neuroticism on subjective well-being: Happy and unhappy people. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 668678.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Costa, P. J., & McCrae, R. R. (1994). Set like plaster? Evidence for the stability of adult personality. In Heatherton, T. F., Weinberger, J. L., Heatherton, T. F. & Weinberger, J. L. (Eds.), Can personality change? (pp. 2140). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
David, E. J. R., & Okazaki, S. (2006). Colonial mentality: A review and recommendation for Filipino American psychology. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 12, 116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
DeYoung, C. G. (2015). Cybernetic Big Five theory. Journal of Research in Personality, 56, 3358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Endler, N. S. (1981). Persons, situations, and their interactions. In Rabin, A. I., Aronoff, J., Barclay, A. M. & Zucker, R. A. (Eds.), Further explorations in personality (pp. 114151). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Fivush, R., Haden, C. A., & Reese, E. (2006). Elaborating on elaborations: Role of maternal reminiscing style in cognitive and socioemotional development. Child Development, 77, 15681588.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Galliher, R., McLean, K. C., & Syed, M. (2017). An integrated model for studying identity content in context. Developmental Psychology, 53, 20112022.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gyberg, F., Frisén, A., Syed, , Wängqvist, M., & Svensson, Y. (2018). “Another kind of Swede”: Swedish youth’s ethnic identity narratives. Emerging Adulthood, 6, 1731.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haden, C. A., Haine, R. A., & Fivush, R. (1997). Developing narrative structure in parent–child reminiscing across the preschool years. Developmental Psychology, 33, 295307.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hammack, P. L. (2008). Narrative and the cultural psychology of identity. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 12, 222247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hammack, P. L. (2011). Narrative and the politics of identity: The cultural psychology of Israeli and Palestinian youth. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Juan, M. J. D., Syed, M., & Azmitia, M. (2016). Intersectionality of race/ethnicity and gender among women of color and white women. Identity, 16, 225238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kunnen, E. S., & Metz, M. (2015). Commitment and exploration: The need for a developmental approach. In McLean, K. C. & Syed, M. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of identity development (pp. 115131). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Loevinger, J. (1976). Ego development. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
McAdams, D. P. (1985). Power, intimacy, and the life story: Personological inquiries into identity. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
McAdams, D. P. (1993). The stories we live by: Personal myths and the making of the self. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
McAdams, D. P. (2006). The redemptive self: Stories Americans live by. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McAdams, D. P. (2015). The art and science of personality development. New York: Guildford Press.Google Scholar
McAdams, D. P., Anyidoho, N. A., Brown, C., Huang, Y. T., Kaplan, B., & Machado, M. A. (2004). Traits and stories: Links between dispositional and narrative features of personality. Journal of Personality, 72, 761784.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McAdams, D. P., Bauer, J. J., Sakaeda, A. R., Anyidoho, N. A., Machado, M. A., Magrino‐Failla, K., … Pals, J. L. (2006). Continuity and change in the life story: A longitudinal study of autobiographical memories in emerging adulthood. Journal of Personality, 74, 13711400.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McAdams, D. P., & Pals, J. L. (2006). A new Big Five: Fundamental principles for an integrative science of personality. American Psychologist, 61, 204217.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McLean, K. C. (2005). Late adolescent identity development: Narrative meaning-making and memory telling. Developmental Psychology, 41, 683691.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McLean, K. C. (2015). The co-authored self: Family stories and the construction of personal identity. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Breen, A. (2009). Gender differences in adolescent meaning-making. Developmental Psychology, 45, 702710.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., Lilgendahl, J. P., Fordham, C., Alpert, E., Marsden, E., Szymanowski, K., & McAdams, D. P. (2017). Identity development in cultural context: The role of deviating from master narratives. Journal of Personality, 65, 121.Google Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Mansfield, C. (2011). The co-construction of adolescent narrative processes: Narrative processing as a function of adolescent age, gender, and maternal scaffolding. Developmental Psychology, 5, 112.Google Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Pasupathi, M. (2006). Collaborative narration of the past and extraversion. Journal of Research in Personality, 40, 12191231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Pasupathi, M. (2012). Looking forwards and looking backwards: Two approaches to identity development. Identity (special issue: Reintegrating Erikson: A theoretical and empirical synthesis of Eriksonian identity models), 12, 828.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., Pasupathi, M., & Pals, J. L. (2007). Selves creating stories creating selves: A process model of narrative self development in adolescence and adulthood. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 11, 262278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Syed, M. (2015). Personal, master, and alternative narratives: An integrative framework for understanding identity development in context. Human Development, 58, 318349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Syed, M. (2015). The field of identity development needs an identity: Introduction to the handbook of identity development. In McLean, K. C. & Syed, M. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of identity development (pp. 110). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., Shucard, H., & Syed, M. (2017). Applying the master narrative framework to gender identity in emerging adulthood: Emerging Adulthood, 5, 93105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLean, K. C., & Thorne, A. (2006). Identity light: Entertainment stories as a vehicle for self-development. In McAdams, D. P., Josselson, R., Lieblich, A., McAdams, D. P., Josselson, R. & Lieblich, A. (Eds.), Identity and story: Creating self in narrative (pp. 111127). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. (2008). The five-factor theory of personality. In John, O. P., Robins, R. W. & Pervin, L. A. (Eds.), Handbook of personality: Theory and research (3rd ed., pp. 159181). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
Miller, P. J., Sandel, T. L., Liang, C-H., & Fung, H. (2001). Narrating transgressions in Longwood: The discourses, meanings, and paradoxes of an American socializing practice. Ethos, 29, 159186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mischel, W., & Peake, P. K. (1982). Analyzing the construction of consistency in personality. Nebraska symposium on motivation (pp. 233262). Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
Murray, H. (1938). Explorations in personality. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Pasupathi, M. (2001). The social construction of the personal past and its implications for adult development. Psychological Bulletin, 127, 651672.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pasupathi, M., Brubaker, J., & Mansour, E. (2007). Developing a life story: Constructing relations between self and experience in autobiographical narratives. Human Development, 50, 85110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pasupathi, M., & Hoyt, T. (2009). The development of narrative identity in late adolescence and emergent adulthood. Developmental Psychology, 45, 558574.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pasupathi, M., McLean, K. C., & Weeks, T. (2008). The told and untold narrative self. Journal of Personality, 77, 89124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pasupathi, M., & Rich, B. (2005). Inattentive listening undermines self‐verification in personal storytelling. Journal of Personality, 73, 10511086.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reese, E., Yan, C., Jack, F., & Hayne, H. (2010). Emerging identities: Narrative and self from early childhood to early adolescence. In McLean, K. C. & Pasupathi, M. (Eds.), Narrative development in adolescence: Creating the storied self. Advancing responsible adolescent development (pp. 2343). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rimé, B., Mesquita, B., Philippot, P., & Boca, S. (1991). Beyond the emotional event: Six studies on the social sharing of emotion. Cognition & Emotion, 5, 435465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Syed, M. (2010). Developing an integrated self: Academic and ethnic identities among ethnically-diverse college students. Developmental Psychology, 46, 15901604.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Syed, M. (2016). Power and agency in conceptualizing life stages as master narratives. Human Development, 59, 317323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Syed, M. (2017). Advancing the cultural study of personality and identity: Models, methods, and outcomes. Current Issues in Personality Psychology, 5, 6572.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Syed, M., & Azmitia, M. (2008). A narrative approach to ethnic identity in emerging adulthood: Bringing life to the identity status model. Developmental Psychology, 44, 10121027.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Syed, M., Juan, M. D., & Juang, L. P. (2011). Might the survey be the intervention? Participating in ethnicity-related research as a consciousness-raising experience. Identity: An International Journal of Theory and Research, 11, 289310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Syed, M., & Nelson, S.C. (2015). Guidelines for establishing reliability when coding narrative data. Emerging Adulthood, 3, 375387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Syed, M., Pasupathi, M., & McLean, K. C. (in press). Master narratives, ethics, and morality. In Jenson, L. A. (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of moral development. New York: Oxford.Google Scholar
Thorne, A. (1987). The press of personality: A study of conversations between introverts and extraverts. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 53, 718726.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thorne, A. (2000). Personal memory telling and personality development. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 4, 4556.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thorne, A., Cutting, L., & Skaw, D. (1998). Young adults’ relationship memories and the life story: Examples or essential landmarks? Narrative Inquiry, 8, 237268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thorne, A., & McLean, K. C. (2003). Telling traumatic events in adolescence: A study of master narrative positioning. In Fivush, R. & Haden, C. (Eds.), Connecting culture and memory: The development of an autobiographical self (pp. 169186). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Thorne, A., McLean, K. C., & Lawrence, A. (2004). When remembering is not enough: Reflecting on self- defining events in late adolescence. Journal of Personality, 72, 513542.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Toolis, E. E., & Hammack, P. L. (2015). The lived experience of homeless youth: A narrative approach. Qualitative Psychology, 2, 5068.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, Q., & Leichtman, M. D. (2000). Same beginnings, different stories: A comparison of American and Chinese children’s narratives. Child Development, 71, 13291346.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Waterman, A. S. (2015). Identity as internal processes: How the ‘I’ comes to define the ‘me’. In McLean, K. C., Syed, M., McLean, K. C. & Syed, M. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of identity development (pp. 195209). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Way, N., & Rogers, O. (2015). ‘[T]hey say Black men won’t make it, but I know I’m gonna make it’: Ethnic and racial identity development in the context of cultural stereotypes. In McLean, K. C., Syed, M., McLean, K. C. & Syed, M. (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of identity development (pp. 269285). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Yoo, H. C., Burrola, K. S., & Steger, M. F. (2010). A preliminary report on a new measure: Internalization of the Model Minority Myth Measure (IM-4) and its psychological correlates among Asian American college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 57, 114.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Allport, G. W. (1937). Personality: A psychological interpretation. New York: Henry Holt.Google Scholar
Allemand, M., Schaffhuser, K., & Martin, M. (2015). Long-term correlated change between personality traits and perceived social support in middle adulthood. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 41, 420432.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Anderson, C., John, O. P., Keltner, D., & Kring, A. M. (2001). Who attains social status? Effects of personality and physical attractiveness in social groups. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 116132.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Asendorpf, J. B., & van Aken, M. A. G. (2003). Personality–relationship transaction in adolescence: Core versus surface personality characteristics. Journal of Personality, 71, 629666.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Asendorpf, J. B., & Wilpers, S. (1998). Personality effects on social relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Relationships 74, 15311544.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Back, M. D., Baumert, A., Denissen, J. J., Hartung, F. M., Penke, L., Schmukle, S. C., … Wrzus, C. (2011). PERSOC: A unified framework for understanding the dynamic interplay of personality and social relationships. European Journal of Personality, 25, 90107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barrera, M. (1986). Distinctions between social support concepts, measures, and models. American Journal of Community Psychology, 14, 413445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barrera, M., Sandler, I. N., & Ramsay, T. B. (1981). Preliminary development of a scale of social support: Studies on college students. American Journal of Community Psychology, 9, 435447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumeister, R. F., & Leary, M. R. (1995). The need to belong: Desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 117, 497529.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Belsky, J., & Pluess, M. (2009). Beyond diathesis stress: Differential susceptibility to environmental influences. Psychological Bulletin, 135, 885908.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berry, D. S., Willingham, J. K., & Thayer, C. A. (2000). Affect and personality as predictors of conflict and closeness in young adults’ friendships. Journal of Research in Personality, 34, 84107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bolger, N., & Amarel, D. (2007). Effects of social support visibility on adjustment to stress: Experimental evidence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92, 458.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bollmer, J. M., Harris, M. J., & Milich, R. (2006). Reactions to bullying and peer victimization: Narratives, physiological arousal, and personality. Journal of Research in Personality, 40, 803828.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowling, N. A., Beehr, T. A., & Swader, W. M. (2005). Giving and receiving social support at work: The roles of personality and reciprocity. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 67, 476489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Branje, S. J., van Lieshout, C. F., & van Aken, M. A. (2004). Relations between Big Five personality characteristics and perceived support in adolescents’ families. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86, 615628.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bridgett, D. J., Gartstein, M. A., Putnam, S. P., McKay, T., Iddins, E., Robertson, C., … Rittmueller, A. (2009). Maternal and contextual influences and the effect of temperament development during infancy on parenting in toddlerhood. Infant Behavior and Development, 32, 103116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brown, B. B., & Larson, J. (2009). Peer relationships in adolescence. In Lerner, R. M. & Steinberg, L. (Eds.), Handbook of adolescent psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 74103). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.Google Scholar
Brown, S. L., Nesse, R. M., Vinokur, A. D., & Smith, D. M. (2003). Providing social support may be more beneficial than receiving it: Results from a prospective study of mortality. Psychological Science, 14, 320327.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Calvete, E., Orue, I., & Gamez-Guadix, M. (2016). Do extraversion and neuroticism moderate the association between bullying victimization and internalizing symptoms? A three-wave longitudinal study. Journal of School Psychology, 56, 111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carver, C. S., & Connor-Smith, J. (2010). Personality and coping. Annual Review of Psychology, 61, 679704.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Caspi, A., Elder, G. H. Jr., & Bem, D. (1988). Moving away from the world: Life-course patterns of shy children. Developmental Psychology, 24, 824831.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caspi, A., Roberts, B. W., & Shiner, R. L. (2005). Personality development: Stability and change. Annual Review of Psychology, 56, 453484.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Charania, M. R., & Ickes, W. (2007). Predicting marital satisfaction: Social absorption and individuation versus attachment anxiety and avoidance. Personal Relationships, 14, 187208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X., French, D. C., & Schneider, B.H. (2006). Peer relationships in cultural context. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X., Li, D., Li, Z., Li, B., & Lui, M. (2002). Sociable and prosocial dimensions of social competence in Chinese children: Common and unique contributions to social, academic, and psychological adjustment. Developmental Psychology, 36, 302314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X., Rubin, K., & Li, B. (1995). Social and school adjustment of shy and aggressive children in China. Developmental and Psychopathology, 7, 337349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X., Wang, L., & DeSouza, A. (2006). Temperament, socioemotional functioning, and peer relationships in Chinese and North American Children. In Chen, X., French, D. C. & Schneider, B. H. (Eds.), Peer relationships in cultural context (pp. 123147). New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheung, F. M., Leung, K., Fan, R. M., Song, W. Z., Zhang, J. X., & Zhang, J. P. (1996). Development of the Chinese personality assessment inventory. Journal of Cross-cultural Psychology, 27 181199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheung, F. M., Leung, K., Zhang, J. X., Sun, H. F., Gan, Y. Q., Song, W. Z., & Xie, D. (2001). Indigenous Chinese personality constructs: Is the five-factor model complete? Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 32, 407433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheung, F. M., van de Vijver, F. J., & Leong, F. T. (2011). Toward a new approach to the study of personality in culture. American Psychologist, 66, 593603.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, S., & McKay, G. (1984). Social support, stress and the buffering hypothesis: A theoretical analysis. In Baum, A., Taylor, S. E. & Singer, J. E. (Eds.), Handbook of psychology and health (Vol. 4, pp. 253267). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Cohen, S., & Wills, T. A. (1985). Stress, social support, and the buffering hypothesis. Psychological Bulletin, 98, 310357.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Condon, J., Corkindale, C., Boyce, P., & Gamble, E. (2013). A longitudinal study of father-to-infant attachment: Antecedents and correlates. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 31, 1530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, W. L., & Kenny, D. A. (2005). The actor–partner interdependence model: A model of bidirectional effects in development studies. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 29, 101109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Costa, P. T. Jr., & McCrae, R. R. (1994). Set like plaster: Evidence for the stability of adult personality. In Heatherton, T. F. & Weinberger, J. L. (Eds.), Can personality change? (pp. 2140). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crockenberg, S. B. (1981). Infant irritability, mother responsiveness, and social support influences on the security of infant-mother attachment. Child Development, 52, 857865.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Decuyper, M., De Bolle, M., & De Fruyt, F. (2012). Personality similarity, perceptual accuracy, and relationship satisfaction in dating and married couples. Personal Relationships, 19, 128145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
De Wolff, M. S., & van IJzendoorn, M. H. (1997). Sensitivity and attachment: A meta-analysis of parental antecedents of infant attachment. Child Development, 68, 571591.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Donnellan, M. B., Conger, R. D., & Bryant, C. M. (2004). The Big Five and enduring marriages. Journal of Research in Personality, 38, 481504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ehrler, D. J., Evans, J. G., & McGhee, R. L. (1999). Extending Big‐Five theory into childhood: A preliminary investigation into the relationship between Big Five personality traits and behavior problems in children. Psychology in the Schools, 36, 451458.3.0.CO;2-E>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eisenberg, N., Fabes, R. A., Guthrie, I. K., & Reiser, M. (2000). Dispositional emotionality and regulation: Their role in predicting quality of social functioning. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 136157.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ellis, B. J., Boyce, W. T., Belsky, J., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., & van IJzendoorn, M. H. (2011). Differential susceptibility to the environment: An evolutionary-neurodevelopmental theory. Development and Psychopathology, 23, 728.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Elster, J. (2015). Explaining social behavior: More nuts and bolts for the social sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Erez, A., & Judge, T. A. (2001). Relationship of core self-evaluation to goal setting motivation, and performance. Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 12701279.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fleeson, W., Malanos, A. B., & Achille, N. M. (2002). An intra-individual process approach to the relationship between extraversion and positive affect: Is acting extraverted as “good” as being extraverted? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83, 14091422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Funder, D. C. (1997). The personality puzzle. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
Gattis, K. S., Berns, S., Simpson, L. E., & Christensen, A. (2004). Birds of a feather or strange birds? Ties among personality dimensions, similarity, and marital quality. Journal of Family Psychology, 18, 564574.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gleason, K. A., Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Ickes, W. (2009). The role of empathic accuracy in adolescents’ peer relations and adjustment. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35, 9971011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gleason, K. A., Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Richardson, D. (2004). Agreeableness and aggression in adolescence. Aggressive Behavior, 30, 4361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gottlieb, B. H., & Bergen, A. E. (2010). Social support concepts and measures. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 69, 511520.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gottman, J. M. (2014). What predicts divorce? The relationship between marital processes and marital outcomes. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Graziano, W. G. (1994). The development of Agreeableness as a dimension of personality. In Halverson, C. F. Jr. & Kohnstamm, G. A. (Eds.), The developing structure of temperament and personality from infancy to adulthood (pp. 339354). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Guralnick, M. J., Hammond, M. A., Neville, B., & Connor, R. T. (2008). The relationship between sources and functions of social support and dimensions of child‐and parent‐related stress. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 52, 11381154.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heine, S. J., & Buchtel, E. E. (2009). Personality: The universal and the culturally specific. Annual Review of Psychology, 60, 369394.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heller, D., Watson, D., & Ilies, R. (2004). The role of person versus situation in life satisfaction: A critical examination. Psychological Bulletin, 130, 574600.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Helson, R., Kwan, V. S. Y., John, O. P., & Jones, C. (2002). The growing evidence for personality change in adulthood: Findings from research with personality inventories. Journal of Research in Personality, 36, 287306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Helson, R., Jones, C., & Kwan, V. S. Y. (2002). Personality change over 40 years of adulthood: Hierarchical linear modeling analyses of two longitudinal samples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83, 752766.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Henderson, S., Duncan-Jones, P., Byrne, D. G., & Scott, R. (1980). Measuring social relationships the interview schedule for social interaction. Psychological Medicine, 10, 723734.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hoffman, M. L. (1983). Affective and cognitive processes in moral internalization. In Higgins, E. T., Ruble, D. & Hartup, W. (Eds.), Social cognition and social development: A sociocultural perspective (pp. 236274). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ickes, W., Hutchison, J., & Mashek, D. (2004). Closeness and intersubjectivity: Social absorption and social individuation. In Mashek, D. & Aron, A. (Eds.), The handbook of closeness and intimacy. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Jensen-Campbell, L. A., Adams, R., Perry, D., Furdella, J. Q., Workman, K. A., & Egan, S. (2002). Agreeableness, extraversion, and peer relations in early adolescence: Winning friends and deflecting aggression. Journal of Research in Personality, 36, 224251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jensen-Campbell, L. A., Gleason, K. A., Adams, R., & Malcolm, K. T. (2003). Interpersonal conflict, agreeableness, and personality development. Journal of Personality, 71, 10591085.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Graziano, W. G. (2001). Agreeableness as a moderator of interpersonal conflict. Journal of Personality, 69, 323362.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jensen-Campbell, L. A., Knack, J. M., Waldrip, A. M., & Campbell, S. D. (2007). Do personality traits associated with self-control influence the regulation of anger and aggression? Journal of Research in Personality, 41, 403424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Malcolm, K. T. (2007). The importance of conscientiousness in adolescent interpersonal relationships. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33, 368383.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kanaiaupuni, S. M., Donato, K. M., Thompson-Colon, T., & Stainback, M. (2005). Counting on kin: Social networks, social support, and child health status. Social Forces, 83, 11371164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, D. A. (1988). Interpersonal perception: A social relations analysis. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 5, 247261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, D. A., Kashy, D. A., & Cook, W. L. (2006). Dyadic data analysis. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kenny, D. A., Mohr, C. D., & Leveseque, M. J. (2001). A social relations variance partitioning of dyadic behavior. Psychological Bulletin, 127, 128141.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kerr, M., Lambert, W. W., & Bem, D. J. (1996). Life course sequelae of childhood shyness in Sweden: Comparison with the United States. Developmental Psychology, 32, 11001105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kiff, C. J., Lengua, L. J., & Zalewski, M. (2011). Nature and nurturing: Parenting in the context of child temperament. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 14, 251301.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kim, H. S., Sherman, D. K., Ko, D., & Taylor, S. E. (2006). Pursuit of comfort and pursuit of harmony: Culture, relationships, and social support seeking. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32, 15951607.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Knack, J. M., Jacquot, C., Jensen-Campbell, L. A., & Malcolm, K. T. (2013). The importance of having agreeable friends (especially when you are not). Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 43, 24012413.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knack, J. M., Rex-Lear, M., Bryant, N., Gomez, M., & Jensen-Campbell., L. A. (2007, March). Personality and social competence in close friendships during childhood. Poster presented at the biannual meeting of the Society of Research in Child Development, Boston, MA.Google Scholar
Kochanska, G. (1993). Toward a synthesis of parental socialization and child temperament in early development of conscience. Child Development, 62, 13791392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kochanska, G. (1995). Children’s temperament, mothers’ discipline, and the security of attachment: Multiple pathways to emerging internalization. Child Development, 64, 325347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kochanska, G. Aksan, N., & Carlson, J. J. (2005). Temperament, relationships, and young children’s receptive cooperation with their parents. Developmental Psychology, 41, 648660.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kochanska, G., Aksan, N., & Joy, M. E. (2007). Children’s fearfulness as a moderator of parenting in early socialization: Two longitudinal studies. Developmental Psychology, 43, 222237.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kochanska, G., Friesenberg, A. E., Lange, L. A., & Martel, M. M. (2004). Parents’ personality and infants’ temperament as contributors to their emerging relationship. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86, 744759.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Krause, N. (2007). Longitudinal study of social support and meaning in life. Psychology and Aging, 22, 456469.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lakey, B., & Cassady, P. B. (1990). Cognitive processes in perceived social support. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59, 337343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lakey, B., Orehek, E., Hain, K. L., & VanVleet, M. (2010). Enacted support’s links to negative affect and perceived support are more consistent with theory when social influences are isolated from trait influences. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36, 132142.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lashley, B. R., & Kenny, D. A. (1998). Power estimation in social relations analyses. Psychological Methods, 3, 328338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lavner, J. A., & Bradbury, T. N. (2010). Patterns of change in marital satisfaction over the newlywed years. Journal of Marriage and Family, 72, 11711187.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lehnart, J., & Neyer, F. J. (2006). Should I stay or should I go? Attachment and personality in stable and instable romantic relationships. European Journal of Personality, 20, 475495.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lengua, L. J., & Kovacs, E. A. (2005). Bidirectional associations between temperament and parenting and the prediction of adjustment problems in middle childhood. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 26, 2138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lubbers, M. J., Van Der Werf, M. P. C., Kuyper, H., & Offringa, G. J. (2006). Predicting peer acceptance in Dutch youth: A multilevel analysis. Journal of Early Adolescence, 26, 435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Luo, S., & Klohnen, E. C. (2005). Assortative mating and marital quality in newlyweds: A couple-centered approach. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 304326.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maccoby, E. E. (2015). Historical overview of socialization research and theory. In Grusec, J. E. & Hastings, P. D. (Eds.), Handbook of socialization: Theory and research (2nd ed., pp. 1341). New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Magnusson, D. (1990). Personality development from an interactional perspective. In Pervin, L. A (Ed.), Handbook of personality: Theory and measurements (pp. 193222). New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Maisel, N. C., & Gable, S. L. (2009). The paradox of received social support: The importance of responsiveness. Psychological Science, 20, 928932.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Malouff, J. M., Thorsteinsson, E. B., Schutte, N. S., Bhullar, N., & Rooke, S. E. (2010). The Five-Factor Model of personality and relationship satisfaction of intimate partners: A meta-analysis. Journal of Research in Personality, 44, 124127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marcus, D., & Kashy, D. (1995). The social relations model: A tool for group psychotherapy research. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 42, 383389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martini, T. S., Root, C. A., & Jenkins, J. M. (2004). Low and middle income mothers’ regulation of negative emotion: Effects of children’s temperament and situational emotional responses. Social Development, 13, 515530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. (1987). Validation of the Five-Factor Model of personality across instruments and observers. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 8190.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mertesacker, B., Bade, U., Haverkock, A., & Pauli-Pott, U. (2004). Predicting maternal reactivity/sensitivity: The role of infant emotionality, maternal depressiveness/anxiety, and social support. Infant Mental Health Journal, 25, 4761.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murphy, G. (1932). An historical introduction to modern psychology (4th rev. ed.). New York: Harcourt, Brace.Google Scholar
Newcomb, A. F., Bukowski, W. P., & Pattee, L. (1993). Children’s peer relations: A meta-analytic review of popular, rejected, neglected, controversial, and average sociometric status. Psychological Bulletin, 113, 99128.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Neyer, F. J., & Asendorf, J. B. (2001). Personality–relationship transaction in young adulthood. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 11901204.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Neyer, F. J., & Lehnart, J. (2007). Relationships matter in personality development: Evidence from an 8‐year longitudinal study across young adulthood. Journal of Personality, 75, 535568.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oliver, J. M., Reed, C. K., Katz, B. M., & Haugh, J. A. (1999). Students’ self-reports of help-seeking: The impact of psychological problems, stress, and demographic variables on utilization of formal and informal support. Social Behavior and Personality: An International Journal, 27, 109128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ozer, D. J., & Benet-Martinez, V. (2006). Personality and the prediction of consequential outcomes. Annual Review of Psychology, 57, 401421.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Penner, L. A., Dovidio, J. F., Piliavin, J. A., & Schroeder, D. A. (2005). Prosocial behavior: Multilevel perspectives. Annual Review of Psychology, 56, 365392.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pierce, G. R., Lakey, B., Sarason, I. G., Sarason, B. R., & Joseph, H. J. (1997). Personality and social support processes. In Pierce, G. R., Lakey, B., Sarason, I. G., Sarason, B. R. & Joseph, H. J. (Eds.), Sourcebook of social support and personality (pp. 318). Boston, MA: Springer US.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pomerantz, E. M., & Thompson, R. A. (2008). Parents role in children’s personality development. In John, O. P., Robins, R. W., & Pervin, L. A. (Eds.), Handbook of personality: Theory and research (p. 351374). New York, NJ: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Pow, J., Lee-Baggley, D., & DeLongis, A. (2017). Who is most likely to seek and give support in the face of agentic and communal threat? The roles of extraversion and agreeableness. Journal of Research in Personality, 70, 6672.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pursell, G. R., Laursen, B., Rubin, K. H., Booth-LaForce, C., & Rose-Krasnor, L. (2008). Gender differences in patterns of association between prosocial behavior, personality, and externalizing problems. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 472481.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reitz, A. K., Zimmermann, J., Hutteman, R., Specht, J., & Neyer, F. J. (2014). How peers make a difference: The role of peer groups and peer relationships in personality development. European Journal of Personality, 28, 279288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reynolds, K. J., Turner, J. C., Branscombe, N. R., Mavor, K. I., Bizumic, B., & Subašić, E. (2010). Interactionism in personality and social psychology: An integrated approach to understanding the mind and behaviour. European Journal of Personality, 24, 458482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, B. W., Caspi, A., & Moffitt, T. E. (2003). Work experiences and personality development in young adulthood. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 582593.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roberts, B. W., Helson, R., & Klohnen, E.G. (2002). Personality development and growth in women across 30 years: Three perspectives. Journal of Personality, 70, 79102.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roberts, B. W., Kuncel, N. R., Shiner, R., Caspi, A., & Goldberg, L. R. (2007). The power of personality: The comparative validity of personality traits, socioeconomic status, and cognitive ability for predicting important life outcomes. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2, 313345.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roberts, B. W., Wood, D., & Smith, J. L. (2005). Evaluating Five Factor theory and social investment perspectives on personality trait development. Journal of Research in Personality, 39, 166184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robins, R. W., Caspi, A., & Moffitt, T. E. (2000). Two personalities, one relationship: Both partners’ personality traits shape the quality of their relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 251259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robins, R. W., Caspi, A., Moffitt, T. E. (2002). It’s not just who you’re with, it’s who you are: Personality and relationship experiences across multiple relationships. Journal of Personality, 70, 925964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rothbart, M. K., & Bates, J. E. (2006). Temperament. In Eisenberg, N., Damon, W. & Lerner, R. M. (Eds.), Handbook of child psychology. Social, emotional and personality development (Vol. 3, pp. 99166). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
Russo, P. M., Mancini, G., Trombini, E., Baldaro, B., Mavroveli, S., & Petrides, K. V. (2012). Trait emotional intelligence and the Big Five: A study on Italian children and preadolescents. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 30, 274283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarason, I. G., Levine, H. M., Basham, R. B., & Sarason, B. R. (1983). Assessing social support: The social support questionnaire. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 44, 127139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarason, I. G., Sarason, B. R., & Shearin, E. N. (1986). Social support as an individual difference variable: Its stability, origins, and relational aspects. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50, 845855.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scarr, S., & McCartney, K. (1983). How people make their own environments: A theory of genotype→environment effects. Child Development, 54, 424435.Google ScholarPubMed
Selfhout, M., Burk, W., Brange, S., Denissen, J., van Aken, M., Meeus, W. (2010). Emerging late adolescent friendship networks and Big Five personality traits: A social network approach. Journal of Personality, 78, 509538.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sevigny, P. R., & Loutzenhiser, L. (2010). Predictors of parenting self-efficacy in mothers and fathers of toddlers. Child: Care, Health and Development, 36, 179189.Google ScholarPubMed
Shaw, B. A., Krause, N., Chatters, L. M., Connell, C. M., & Ingersoll-Dayton, B. (2004). Emotional support from parents early in life, aging, and health. Psychology and Aging, 19, 412.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shiner, R. L., & Masten, A. S. (2012). Childhood personality as a harbinger of competence and resilience in adulthood. Development and Psychopathology, 24, 507528.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shiota, M. N., Keltner, D., & John, O. P. (2006). Positive emotion dispositions differentially associated with Big Five personality and attachment style. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1, 6171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, C. L., Spinrad, T. L., Eisenberg, N., Gaertner, B. M., Popp, T. K., & Maxon, E. (2007). Maternal personality: Longitudinal associations to parenting behavior and maternal emotional expressions toward toddlers. Parenting: Science and Practice, 7, 305329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Solomon, B. C., & Jackson, J. J. (2014). Why do personality traits predict divorce? Multiple pathways through satisfaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106, 978996.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Soto, C. J., John, O. P., Gosling, S. D., & Potter, J. (2011). Age differences in personality traits from 10 to 65: Big Five domains and facets in a large cross-sectional sample. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 330348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stright, A. D., Gallagher, K. C., & Kelley, K. (2008). Infant temperament moderates relations between maternal parenting in early childhood and children’s adjustment in first grade. Child Development, 79, 186200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Suls, J., Martin, R., & David, J. P. (1998). Person–environment fit and its limits: Agreeableness, neuroticism, and emotional reactivity to interpersonal conflict. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 24, 8898.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swickert, R. J., Hittner, J. B., & Foster, A. (2010). Big Five traits interact to predict perceived social support. Personality and Individual Differences, 48, 736741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swickert, R. J., Rosentreter, C. J., Hittner, J. B., & Mushrush, J. E. (2002). Extraversion, social support processes, and stress. Personality and Individual Differences, 32, 877891.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, S. E., Sherman, D. K., Kim, H. S., Jarcho, J., Takagi, K., & Dunagan, M. S. (2004). Culture and social support: Who seeks it and why? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 87, 354362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thoits, P. A. (2011). Mechanisms linking social ties and support to physical and mental health. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 52, 145161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Uchino, B. N. (2009). Understanding the links between social support and physical health: A life-span perspective with emphasis on the separability of perceived and received support. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4, 236255.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Aken, M. A. G., Denissen, J. J. A., Branje, S. J. T., Dubas, J. S., & Goossens, L. (2006). Midlife concerns and short-term personality change in middle adulthood. European Journal of Personality, 20, 497513.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Bakel, H. J., & Riksen‐Walraven, J. M. (2002). Parenting and development of one‐year‐olds: Links with parental, contextual, and child characteristics. Child Development, 73, 256273.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Watson, D., & Clark, L. A. (1984). Negative affectivity: The disposition to experience aversive emotional states. Psychological Bulletin, 96, 465490.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
White, J. K., Hendrick, S. S., & Hendrick, C. (2004). Big Five personality variables and relationship constructs. Personality and Individual Differences, 37, 15191530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wellisch, D., Kagawa‐Singer, M., Reid, S. L., Lin, Y. J., Nishikawa‐Lee, S., & Wellisch, M. (1999). An exploratory study of social support: A cross‐cultural comparison of Chinese‐, Japanese‐, and Anglo‐American breast cancer patients. PsychoOncology, 8, 207219.3.0.CO;2-B>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wellman, B., & Wortley, S. (1990). Different strokes from different folks: Community ties and social support. American Journal of Sociology, 96, 558588.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wethington, E., & Kessler, R. C. (1986). Perceived support, received support, and adjustment to stressful life events. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 27, 7889.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williamson, J. A., & O’Hara, M. W. (2017). Who gets social support, who gives it, and how it’s related to recipient’s mood. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 43, 13551377.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wills, T. A., & Shinar, O. (2000). Measuring perceived and received social support. In Cohen, S., Underwood, L. G. & Gottlieb, B. H. (Eds.), Social support measurement and intervention: A guide for health and social scientists (pp. 86135). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wood, D., & Roberts, B.W. (2006). The effect of age and role information on expectations for Big Five personality traits. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32, 14821496.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zimmermann, J., & Neyer, F. J. (2013). Do we become a different person when hitting the road? Personality development of sojourners. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 515530.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zhu, X., Woo, S. E., Porter, C., & Brzezinski, M. (2013). Pathways to happiness: From personality to social networks and perceived support. Social Networks, 35, 382393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ainsworth, M. D., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of attachment: A psychological study of the strange situation. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Allik, J., & McCrae, R. R. (2002). A Five-Factor theory perspective. In McCrae, R. R. & Allik, J. (Eds.), International and cultural psychology series: The Five-Factor model of personality across cultures (pp. 303322). New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allik, J., & McCrae, R. R. (2004). Toward a geography of personality traits: Patterns of profiles across 36 cultures. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 35, 1328.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allik, J., & Realo, A. (2017). How valid are culture-level mean personality scores? In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Trait psychology across cultures (Vol. 1, pp. 193224). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger/ABC-CLIO.Google Scholar
Allik, J., Realo, A., Mottus, R., Pullmann, H., Trifonova, A., McCrae, R. R. & 55 Members of the Russian Character and Personality Survey. (2011). Personality profiles and the ‘Russian soul’: Literary and scholarly views evaluated. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 42, 372389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bardi, A., Buchanan, K. E., Goodwin, R., Slabu, L., & Robinson, M. (2014). Value stability and change during self-chosen life transitions: Self-selection versus socialization effects. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106, 131147.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Becker, M., Vignoles, V. L., Owe, E., Easterbrook, M. J., Brown, R., Smith, P. B., … Koller, S. H. (2014). Cultural bases for self-evaluation: Seeing oneself positively in different cultural contexts. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 657675.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Benedict, R. (1934). Patterns of culture. New York: Mentor.Google Scholar
Benedict, R. (1946). The chrysanthemum and the sword. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
Benet-Martínez, V., & John, O. P. (2000). Toward the development of quasi-indigenous personality constructs: Measuring Los Cinco Grandes in Spain with indigenous Castilian markers. American Behavioral Scientist, 44, 141157.Google Scholar
Boas, F. (1910). Psychological problems in anthropology. American Journal of Psychology, 21, 371384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bond, M. H., Leung, K., Au, A., Tong, K.-K., de Carrasquel, S. R., Murakami, F., … Lewis, J. R. (2004). Culture-level dimensions of social axioms and their correlates across 41 cultures. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 35, 548570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bond, M. H., Leung, K., Au, A., Tong, K.-K., & Chemonges-Nielson, Z. (2004). Combining social axioms with values in predicting social behaviors. European Journal of Personality, 18, 177191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boski, P., Biłas-Henne, M., & Wiȩckowska, J. (2009). Cynicism in love and in politics. In Leung, K. & Bond, M. H. (Eds.), Psychological aspects of social axioms; International and Cultural Psychology (pp. 239266). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss, Vol. 1. Attachment. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Chen, S. X., Bond, M. H., & Cheung, F. M. (2006). Personality correlates of social axioms: Are beliefs nested within personality? Personality and Individual Difference, 40, 509519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, S, X., Lam, B. C. P., Wu, W. C. H., Ng, J. C. K., Buchtel, E. E., & Guan, Y. (2016). Do people’s world views matter? The why and how. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 110, 743765.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cheung, F. M., Cheung, S. F., & Fan, W. (2013). From Chinese to cross-cultural personality inventory: A combined emic-etic approach to the study of personality in culture. In Gelfand, M. J., Chiu, C.-Y. & Hong, Y.-Y. (Eds.), Advances in culture and psychology (pp. 117179). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cheung, F. M., Fan, W., & Cheung, S. F. (2017). Indigenous measurement of personality in Asia. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Trait psychology across cultures (Vol. 1, pp. 105135). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Chinese Culture Connection (1987). Chinese values and the search for culture-free dimensions of culture. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 18, 143164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chirkov, V. (2017). Culture and autonomy. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Culture and characteristic adaptations (Vol. 2, pp. 91120). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Church, A. T. (2009). Prospects for an integrated trait and cultural psychology. European Journal of Psychology, 23, 686701.Google Scholar
Church, A. T. (Ed.) (2017). The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Evolutionary, ecological, and cultural contexts of personality (Vols. 1–3). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Church, A. T., Alvarez, J. M., Katigbak, M. S., Mastor, K. A., Cabrera, H. F., Tanaka-Matsumi, J., … Buchanan, A. L. (2012). Self-concept consistency and short-term stability in eight cultures. Journal of Research in Personality, 46, 556570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Church, A. T., Anderson-Harumi, C. A., del Prado, A. M., Curtis, G. J., Tanaka-Matsumi, J., Valdez Medina, J. L., … Katigbak, M. S. (2008). Culture, cross-role consistency, and adjustment: Testing trait and cultural psychology perspectives. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 739755.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Church, A. T., Katigbak, M. S., Ching, C. M., Zhang, H., Shen, J., Arias, R. M., … Alvarez, M. (2013). Within-individual variability in self-concepts and personality states: Applying density distribution and situation-behavior approaches across cultures. Journal of Research in Personality, 47, 922935.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Church, A. T., Katigbak, M. S., Reyes, J. A. S., Salanga, M. G. C., Miramontes, L. A., & Adams, N. B. (2008). Prediction and cross-situational consistency of daily behavior across cultures: Testing trait and cultural psychology perspectives. Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 11991215.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Colman, A. M. (2001). Dictionary of psychology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cross, S. E., & Lam, B. C. P. (2017). Cultural models of self: East-West differences and beyond. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Culture and characteristic adaptations (Vol. 2, pp. 133). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Diaz-Guerrero, R. (1977). A Mexican psychology. American Psychologist, 32, 934944.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Diaz-Guerrero, R. (1994). Psicología del mexicano: descubrimiento de la etnopsicología [Psychology of the Mexican: Discovery of ethnopsychology]. Mexico City: Trillas.Google Scholar
Díaz-Guerrero, R. (2004). 50 años de psicología interamericana. Una visión desde México. Interamerican Journal of Psychology, 38, 333342.Google Scholar
Díaz-Loving, R., Rivera-Aragón, S., Villanueva-Orozco, G. B. T., & Cruz-Martínez, L. M. (2011). Las premisas histórico-socioculturales de la familia mexicana: su exploración desde las creencias y las normas [The historic-sociocultural premises of the Mexican family proceeding from beliefs and norms]. Revista Mexicana de Investigación en Psicología, 3, 128142.Google Scholar
Draguns, J. G. (2009). Personality in cross-cultural perspective. In Corr, P. J. & Matthews, G. (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of personality psychology (pp. 556576). Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DuBois, C. (1944). The People of Alor. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
Fetvadjiev, V. H., Meiring, D., M., Nel, J. A., Hill, C., & van de Vijver, F. J. R. (2017). Indigenous personality structure and measurement in South Africa. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Evolutionary, ecological, and cultural contexts of personality (Vol. 3, pp. 137160). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Fetvadjiev, V. H., Meiring, D., van de Vijver, F. J. R., Nel, J. A., & Hill, C. (2015). The South African Personality Inventory (SAPI): A culture-informed instrument for the country’s main ethnocultural groups. Psychological Assessment, 27, 828837.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fischer, R. (2018). Personality, values, culture: An evolutionary approach. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Fischer, R., & Boer, D. (2015). Motivational basis of personality traits: A meta-analysis of value-personality correlations. Journal of Personality, 83, 491510.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gelfand, M. J., Harrington, J. R., & Fernandez, J. R. (2017). Cultural tightness-looseness: Ecological affordances and implications for personality. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Evolutionary, ecological, and cultural contexts of personality (Vol. 3, pp. 207–35). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Gelfand, M. J ., Raver, J. L., Nishii, L., Leslie, L. A., Lun, J., Lim, B. C., … Yamaguchi, S. (2011). Differences between tight and loose cultures: A 33-nation study. Science, 332, 11001104.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goldberg, L. R. (1992). The development of markers for the Big Five factor structure. Psychological Assessment, 4, 2642.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamamura, T. (2012). Are cultures becoming individualistic? A cross-temporal comparison of individualism-collectivism in the United States and Japan. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 16, 324.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heine, S. J. (2001). Self as cultural product: An examination of East Asian and North American selves. Journal of Personality, 69, 888906.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heine, S. J., & Buchtel, E. E. (2009). Personality: The universal and the culturally specific. Annual Review of Psychology, 60, 369394.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Herskovits, M. (1949). Man and his works. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
Hofstede, G. (1980). Culture’s consequences: International differences in work-related values. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Hofstede, G. (1994). Cultures and organizations. Software of the mind. London: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Hofstede, G. (2001). Culture’s consequences: Comparing values, behaviors, institutions and organizations across nations (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Hofstede, G., Hofstede, G. J., & Minkov, M. (2010). Cultures and organizations: Software of the mind (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Hofstede, G., & McCrae, R. R. (2004). Personality and culture revisited: Linking traits and dimensions of culture. Cross-Cultural Research, 38, 5288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hogan, R., & Bond, M. H. (2009). Culture and personality. In Corr, P. J. & Mathews, G. (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of personality psychology (pp. 577588). New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Iliescu, D., Dincă, M., & Bond, M. H. (2017). The increment of social axioms over broad personality traits in the prediction of dyadic adjustment: An investigation across four ethnic groups. European Journal of Personality, 21, 630641.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Inglehart, R. (1997). Modernization and postmodernization: Cultural, economic and political change in 43 societies. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Inkeles, A., & Levinson, D. J. (1969). The study of modal personality and sociocultural systems. In Lindzey, G. & Aronson, E. (Eds.), Handbook of social psychology (Vol. 4, 2nd ed., pp. 418499). Cambridge, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
James, W. (1890/1952). The principles of psychology. Chicago, IL: Encyclopedia BritannicaGoogle Scholar
Kardiner, A. (1939). The individual and his society. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Keller, H. (2007). Cultures of infancy. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Keller, H. (2013). Attachment and culture. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 44,175194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keller, H. (2015). Attachment. A pancultural need but a cultural construct. Current Opinion in Psychology, 8, 5963.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Keller, H., & Bard, K. A. (2017). The contextual nature of attachment: Contextualizing relationships and development. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khaleque, A., & Rohner, R. P. (2012). Transnational relations between perceived parental acceptance and personality dispositions of children and adults: A meta-analytic review. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 16, 103115.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kim, Y.-H., Cohen, D., & Au, W.-T. (2010). The jury and abjury of my peers: The self in face and dignity cultures. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98, 904916.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kim, Y-H., Kwon, H., Seo, M., & Seo, D. (2017). The self in face and dignity cultures. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Evolutionary, ecological, and cultural contexts of personality (Vol. 3, pp. 237263). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Kimura, B. (1995). Zwischen Mensch und Mensch [Between one human being and another], Weinhendl, H. (trans.). Darmstadt, Germany: Akademische Verlagsanstalt.Google Scholar
Kitayama, S., Conway, L. G. III, Pietromonaco, P. R., Park, H., & Plaut, V. C. (2010). Ethos of independence across regions in the United States: The production-adoption model of cultural change. American Psychologist, 65, 559574.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kitayama, S., Duffy, S., & Uchida, Y. (2007). Self as cultural mode of being. In Kitayama, S. & Cohen, D. (Eds.), Handbook of cultural psychology (pp. 136174). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Komatsu, K., Sakai, K., Nishioka, M., & Mukoyama, Y. (2012). The Gitaigo Personality Scale for description of self and others. The Japanese Journal of Psychology, 83, 8290.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kurman, J. (2011). What I do and what I think they would do: Social axioms and behavior. European Journal of Personality, 25, 410423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lebedeva, N. M. (2000). Bazovye tsennosti russkikh na rubezhe XXI veks [The basic values of Russians at the threshold of the XXI century]. Psikhologicheskiy Zhurnal, 21, 7387.Google Scholar
Leung, K., Bond, M. H., de Carrasquel, S. H., Muñoz, C., Hernandez, M., Murakami, F., … Singelis, T. M. (2002). Social axioms: The search for universal dimensions of general beliefs about how the world functions. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 33, 286302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leung, K., & Bond, M. H. (Eds.) (2009). Psychological aspects of social axioms: Understanding global belief systems. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leung, K., Lam, B. C. P., Bond, M. H., Conway, G. C. III, Gornick, L. J., Amponsah, B., … Zhou, F. (2012). Developing and evaluating the Social Axioms Survey in eleven countries: Its relationship with the Five-Factor Model of personality. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 43, 833857.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
LeVine, R. A. (2001). Culture and personality studies, 1918–1960: Myth and history. Journal of Personality, 69, 803818.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
LeVine, R. A., Dixon, S., LeVine, S., Richman, A., Liederman, P. H., Keefer, C. H., & Brazerton, T. B. (1994). Children and culture: Lessons from Africa. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
LeVine, R. A., & Levine, S. E. (1988). Parental strategies among the Gusii in Kenya. In LeVine, R. A., Miller, P. M. & West, M. M. (Eds.), Parental behavior in diverse societies (pp. 2736). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
LeVine, R. A., & LeVine, S A. (2007). Ethnographic studies of childhood: A historical overview. American Anthropologist, 109, 247260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Linton, R. (1945). The cultural background of personality. New York: Appleton-Century.Google Scholar
Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, S. (1991). Culture and the self: Implications for cognition, emotion, and motivation. Psychological Review, 98, 224253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, A. (1998). The cultural psychology of personality. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 29, 6387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Markus, H, R., & Kitayama, S. (2010). Cultures and selves: A cycle of mutual constitution. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 5, 420430.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Martin, T. A., Costa, P. T. Jr. Oryol, V. E., Rukavishnikov, A. A., & Senin, I. G. (2002). Applications of the Russian NEO-P1-R. In McCrae, R. R. & Allik, J. (Eds.), The Five-Factor Model of personality across cultures (pp. 261–77). New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Press.Google Scholar
Matsumoto, D., & Juang, L. (2016). Culture and psychology (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.Google Scholar
McCrae, R. R. (2017). The Five-Factor Model across cultures. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures (Vol. 1, pp. 4771). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. (1987). Validation of the five-factor model of personality across instruments and observers. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 8190.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCrae, R. R., & Costa, P. T. Jr. (1997). Personality trait structure as a human universal. American Psychologist, 52, 509516.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCrae, R. R., Terracciano, A., & 79 Members of the Personality Profiles of Cultures Project (2005). Personality profiles of cultures: Aggregate personality traits. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89, 407425.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCrae, R. R., Terracciano, A., & 78 Members of the Personality Profiles of Cultures Project (2005). Universal features of personality traits from the observer’s perspective: Data from 50 cultures. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 547561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mead, M. (1935). Sex and temperament in three primitive societies. New York: Mentor.Google Scholar
Minkov, M. (2007). What makes us similar and different? Sofia, Bulgaria: Klasika y Stil.Google Scholar
Minkov, M. (2011). Cultural differences in a globalizing world. New York: Emerald Group Publishing.Google Scholar
Mischel, W., Shoda, Y., & Ayduk, O. (2007). Introduction to personality: Toward an integrative science of the person (8th ed.). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Murdock, G. P. (1967). Ethnographic atlas. Pittsburgh, PA: Pittsburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Okeke, B. I., Draguns, J. G., Sheku, B., & Allen, W. (1999). Culture, self, and personality in Africa. In Lee, Y.-T., McCauley, C. R. & Draguns, J. G. (Eds.), Personality and person perception across cultures (pp. 139163). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Oltmanns, T. F., & Emery, R. E. (2014). Abnormal psychology (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.Google Scholar
Otto, H., & Keller, H. (Eds.) (2018). Different faces of attachment: Cultural variations on universal human need. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Parin, P., Morgenthaler, F., & Parin-Mathey, G. (1963). Die Weissen denken zu viel: Psychoanalytische Untersuchungen bei den Dogon in Westafrika [The whites think too much: psychoanalytic investigations among the Dogon of West Africa]. Zurich, Switzerland: Atlantis Verlag.Google Scholar
Parin, P., Morgenthaler, F., & Parin-Mathey, G. (1980). Fear thy neighbor as thyself: Psychoanalysis and society among the Anyi of West Africa. Klamath, P. (trans.). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Parks-Leduc, L., Feldman, G., & Bardi, A. (2015). Personality traits and personal values: A meta-analysis. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 19, 329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peabody, D. (1985). National characteristics. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Peabody, D. (1999). Nationality characteristics: Dimensions for comparison. In Lee, Y.-T., McCauley, C. R. & Draguns, J. G. (Eds.), Personality and person perception across cultures (pp. 6584). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Pelto, P. J. (1968). The differences between “tight” and “loose” societies. Trans-action, 5, 3740.Google Scholar
Piker, S. (1998). Contributions of psychological anthropology. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 29, 931.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Poortinga, Y. H., & van Hemert, D. A. (2001). Personality and culture demarcating between the common and the unique. Journal of Personality, 69, 10331060.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Realo, A., Allik, J., Lönnqvist, J.-E., Verkasalo, M., Kwiatkowska, A., Kööts, L., … Renge, V. (2009). Mechanisms of the national character stereotype: How people in six neighboring countries of Russia describe themselves and the typical Russian. European Journal of Personality, 23, 229249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roccas, S., & Elster, A. (2014). Values and religiosity. In Saroglou, V. (Ed.), Religion, personality, and social behavior (pp. 193212). New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Rohner, R. P. (1975). They love me, they love me not. New Haven, CT: HRAF Press.Google Scholar
Rohner, R. P. (1986). New perspectives on family: The warmth dimension: Foundations of parental acceptance-rejection theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Rohner, R. P. (2004). The Parental “Acceptance-Rejection Syndrome”: Universal correlates of perceived rejection. American Psychologist, 59, 830840.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rohner, R. P. (2016). Introduction to Interpersonal Acceptance-Rejection Theory (IPARTheory) and evidence. Online Readings in Psychology and Culture, 6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roland, A. (1988). In search of self in India and Japan. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Roland, A. (1996). Cultural pluralism and psychoanalysis: The Asian and North American experience. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Rolland, J.-P. (2002). The cross-cultural generalizability of the Five-Factor model of personality. In McCrae, R. R. & Allik, J. (Eds.), The Five-Factor Model of personality across cultures (pp. 728). New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rothbaum, F., & Trommsdorff, G. (2004). Do roots and wings complement or oppose one another? The socialization of relatedness and autonomy in cultural context. In Grusec, J. E. & Hastings, P. (Eds.), The handbook of socialization (pp. 481489). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Rothbaum, F., & Trommsdorff, G. (2007). Do roots and wings complement or oppose one another? The socialization of relatedness and autonomy in cultural context. In Grusec, J. E. & Hastings, P. (Eds.), The handbook of socialization (pp. 481489). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Schmitt, D. P., Allik, J., McCrae, R. R., & Benet-Martínez, V. (2007). The geographic distribution of Big Five Personality traits: Patterns and profiles of human self-description across 56 nations. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 38, 173212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwartz, S. H. (1992). Universals in the content and structure of values: Theoretical advances and empirical tests in 20 countries. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 25, 165.Google Scholar
Schwartz, S. H. (2017). Individual values across cultures. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Culture and characteristic adaptations (Vol. 2, pp. 121152). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Schwartz, S. H., & Bardi, A. (1997). Influences of adaptation to communist rule on value priorities in Eastern Europe. Political Psychology, 18, 385410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwartz, S. H., & Bardi, A. (2001). Value hierarchies across cultures: Taking a similarities perspective. Journal of Cross-cultural Psychology, 32, 268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwartz, S. H., & Rubel-Lifschitz, T. (2009). Cross-national variation in the size of sex differences in values: Effects of gender equality. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 97, 171185.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schwartz, S. H., & Sagiv, L. (1995). Identifying culture-specifics in the context and structure of values. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 26, 92116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, P. B., & Easterbrook, M. J. (2017). Individualism and collectivism: Implications for personality and identity. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Evolutionary, ecological, and cultural contexts of personality (pp. 149177). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
Stefanenko, T. (1999). Etnopsikhologiya (Ethnopsychology). Moscow: Akademicheskiy Proyekt.Google Scholar
Takata, T. (2012). Nippon bunka deno jinkaku keisei- sougo dokuritsusei・sougokyochousei Hattatsuteki kentou [Personality development in Japanese culture-Developmental study of independence and interdependence]. Kyoto, Japan: Nakanishiya Shoten.Google Scholar
Terracciano, A., Abdel-Khalek, A. M., Ádám, N., Adamovová, L., Ahn, C. -k., Ahn, H-N., … McCrae, R. R. (2005). National character does not reflect mean personality trait levels in 49 Cultures. Science, 310, 96100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Triandis, H. C. (1989). The self and social behavior in differing cultural contexts. Psychological Review, 96, 506520.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Triandis, H. C. (1995). Individualism & collectivism. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar
Trommsdorff, G. (2009). Intergenerational relations and cultural transmission. In Schönpflug, U. (Ed.), Cultural transmission: Psychological, developmental, social, and methodological aspects (pp. 126160). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Trommsdorff, G. (2012). Development of “agentic” regulation in cultural context: The role of self and world views. Child Development Perspective, 6, 1926.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tulviste, T., Konstabel, K., & Tulviste, P. (2014). Stability and change in value consensus of ethnic Estonians and Russian-speaking minority. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 39, 93102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Uskul, A. K., Sherman, D. K., & Fitzgibbon, J. (2009). The cultural congruency effect: Culture, regulatory focus, and the effectiveness of gain- vs. loss-framed health messages. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 535541.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Valchev, V. H., Nel, J. A., van de Vijver, F. J. R., Meiring, D., de Bruin, G. P., & Rothmann, S. (2013). Similarities and differences in implicit personality concepts across ethnocultural groups in South Africa. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 44, 365388.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van de Vijver, F. J. R., & He, J. (2017). Bias and equivalence in cross-cultural personality research. In Church, A. T. (Ed.), The Praeger handbook of personality across cultures: Culture and characteristic adaptations (Vol. 2, pp. 251277). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.Google Scholar
van der Linden, D., te Nijenhuis, J., & Bakker, A. (2010). The general factor of personality: A meta-analysis of Big Five intercorrelations and a criterion-related validity study. Journal of Research in Personality, 44, 315327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vignoles, V. L., Owe, E., Becker, M., Smith, P. B., Easterbrook, M. J., Brown, R., … Bond, M. H. (2016). Beyond the “east-west” dichotomy: Global variation in cultural models of selfhood. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 9661000.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
White, G. M. (1992). Ethnopsychology. In Schwartz, T., White, G. M. & Lutz, C. A. (Eds.), Publications of the Society for Psychological Anthropology, 3. New directions in psychological anthropology (pp. 2146). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Adorno, T., Frenkel-Brunswik, E., Levinson, D., & Sanford, R. (1950). The authoritarian personality. New York: Harper.Google Scholar
Altemeyer, R. A. (1981). Right-wing authoritarianism. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: University of Manitoba Press.Google Scholar
Altemeyer, R. A. (1996). The authoritarian specter. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Altemeyer, R. A. (1998). The other “authoritarian personality.” In Zanna, M. P. (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 30, pp. 4791). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Aspelund, A., Lindeman, M., & Verkasalo, M. (2013). Political conservatism and left–right orientation in 28 eastern and western European countries. Political Psychology, 34, 409417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: Freeman.Google Scholar
Barbaranelli, C., Caprara, G. V., Vecchione, M., & Fraley, R. C. (2007). Voters’ personality traits in presidential elections. Personality and Individual Differences, 42, 11991208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barber, J. D. (1965). The lawmakers. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Barber, J. D. (1985). The presidential character: Predicting performance in the white house (3rd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Barnea, M., & Schwartz, S. H. (1998). Values and voting. Political Psychology, 19, 1740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Best, H. (2011). Does personality matter in politics? Personality factors as determinants of parliamentary recruitment and policy preferences. Comparative Sociology, 10, 942962.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Block, J., & Block, J. H. (2006). Nursery school personality and political orientation two decades later. Journal of Research in Personality, 40, 734749.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bobbio, N. (1996). Left and right. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
Brewster-Smith, M. (1968). A map for the analysis of personality and politics. Journal of Social Issues, 24, 1528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Browning, R., & Jacob, H. (1964). Power motivation and the political personality. Public Opinion Quarterly, 28, 7590.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, A., Converse, P. E., Miller, W. E., & Stokes, D. E. (1960). The American voter. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Campbell, A., Gurin, G., & Miller, W. (1954). The voter decides. Evanston, IL: Row Peterson.Google Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Barbaranelli, C., & Zimbardo, P. G. (1999). Personality profiles and political parties. Political Psychology, 20, 175197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Barbaranelli, C., Consiglio, C., Picconi, L., & Zimbardo, P. G. (2003). Personalities of politicians and voters: Unique and synergistic relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 849856.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Caprara, G. V., Francescato, D., Mebane, M., Sorace, R., & Vecchione, M. (2010). Personality foundation of ideological divide: A comparison of women members of parliament and women voters in Italy. Political Psychology, 31, 739762.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Schwartz, S., Capanna, C., Vecchione, M., & Barbaranelli, C. (2006) Values, traits, and political choice. Political Psychology, 27, 128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Schwartz, S. H., Vecchione, M., & Barbaranelli, C. (2008). The personalization of politics: Lessons from the Italian case. European Psychologist, 3, 157172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., & Vecchione, M. (2017). Personalizing politics and realizing democracy. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., & Vecchione, M. (2018). On the left and right ideological divide: Historical accounts and contemporary perspectives. Political Psychology, 39, 4983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Vecchione, M., Capanna, C., & Mebane, M. (2009). Perceived political self-efficacy: Theory, assessment, and applications. European Journal of Social Psychology, 39, 10021020.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Vecchione, M., & Schwartz, S. H. (2009). The mediational role of values in linking personality traits to political orientation. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 12, 8294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Vecchione, M., & Schwartz, S. H. (2012). Why people do not vote: The role of personal values. European Psychologist, 17, 266278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., Vecchione, M., Schwartz, S. H., Schoen, H., Bain, P., Silvester, J., Cieciuch, J., … Caprara, M. G. (2017). Basic values, ideology, and voting: A cross-cultural study. Cross-Cultural Research, 51, 388411.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caprara, G. V., & Zimbardo, P. (2004). Personalizing politics. American Psychologist, 59, 581594.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carney, D., Jost, J. T., Gosling, S. D., Niederhoffer, K., & Potter, J. (2008). The secret lives of liberals and conservatives: Personality profiles, interpersonal styles, and the things they have behind. Political Psychology, 29, 807840.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cocks, G. (1986). Contribution of psychohistory to understanding politics. In Hermann, M. G. (Ed.), Political Psychology (pp. 139166). San Francisco, NC: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Conway, L. G. III, Suedfeld, P., & Tetlock, P. E. (2001). Integrative complexity and political decisions that lead to war or peace. In Christie, D. J. (Ed.), Peace, conflict, and violence: Peace psychology for the 21st century (pp. 6675). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall/Pearson Education.Google Scholar
Costantini, E., & Craik, K. H. (1980). Personality and politicians: California party leaders, 1960–1976. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 641661.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dietrich, B. J., Lasley, S., Mondak, J. J., Remmel, M. L., & Turner, J. (2012). Personality and legislative politics: The Big Five trait dimensions among U.S. state legislators. Political Psychology, 33, 195210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Digman, J. M. (1990). Personality structure: Emergence of the Five Factors Model. Annual Review of Psychology, 41, 417-440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Di Renzo, G. (1963). Personalità e potere politico [Personality and political leadership]. Bologna, Italy: Il Mulino.Google Scholar
Di Renzo, G. (1977). Politicians and personality: A cross cultural perspective. In Hermann, M. G. (Ed.), A psychological examination of political leaders (pp. 147204). New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
Duckitt, J., & Sibley, C. G. (2009). A dual-process motivational model of ideology, politics, and prejudice. Psychological Inquiry, 20, 98109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duckitt, J., Wagner, C., du Plessis, I., & Birum, I. (2002). The psychological basis of ideology and prejudice: Testing a dual process model. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83, 7593.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Erikson, E. H. (1969). Gandhi’s truth. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
Etheredge, L. S. (1978). Personality effects on American foreign policy, 1898–1968: A test of interpersonal generalization theory. American Political Science Review 72, 434451.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eysenck, H. (1954). The psychology of politics. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Feldman, S. (1988). Structure and consistency in public opinion: The role of core beliefs and values. American Journal of Political Science, 32, 416440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feldman, O. (1996). The political personality of Japan: An inquiry into the belief systems of Diet Members. Political Psychology, 17, 657682.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feldman, S. (2003). Values, ideology, and structure of political attitudes. In Sears, D. O., Huddy, L. & Jervis, R. (Eds.), Oxford handbook of political psychology (pp. 477508). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gallego, A., & Oberski, D. (2012). Personality and political participation: The mediation hypothesis. Political Behavior, 34, 425451.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
George, A. L., & George, J. L. (1956). Woodrow Wilson and Colonel House: A personality study. New York: John Day.Google Scholar
George, A. L., & George, J. L. (1998). Presidential personality. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar
Gerber, A. S., Huber, G. A., Doherty, D., & Dowling, C. M. (2011). Big Five personality traits in the political arena. Annual Review of Political Science, 14, 265287.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gerber, A. S, Huber, G., Doherty, D., Dowling, C., & Ha, S. (2010). Personality and political attitudes: Relationships across issue domains and political contexts. American Political Science Review, 104, 111133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gerber, A. S, Huber, G., Ha, S., Dowling, C., & Doherty, D. (2009). Personality traits and the dimensions of political ideology. Available at SSRN: http:// ssrn.com/ abstract=1412863CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glad, B. (1973). Contributions of psychobiography. In Knutson, J. N. (Ed.), Handbook of political psychology (pp. 296321). San Francisco, NC: Jossey Bass.Google Scholar
Greenberg, J., & Jonas, E. (2003). Psychological motives and political orientation – the Left, the Right, and the Rigid: Comment on Jost et al. (2003). Psychological Bulletin, 129, 376382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greenstein, F. I. (1975). Personality and Politics. In Greenstein, F. I. & Polsby, N. W. (Eds.), The handbook of political science (Vol. 2, pp. 192). Reading, MA: Addison Wesley.Google Scholar
Gruenfeld, D. H. (1995). Status, ideology, and integrative ideology on the U.S. Supreme Court: Rethinking the politics of political decision making. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 68, 520.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ha, S. E., Kim, S., & Jo, S. H. (2013). Personality traits and political participation: Evidence from South Korea. Political Psychology, 34, 511532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hermann, M. G. (Ed.) (1977). A psychological examination of political leaders. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
Himmelweit, H., Humphreys, P., Jaeger, M., & Katz, M. (1981). How voters decide: A longitudinal study of political attitudes and voting extending over fifteen years. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Jost, J. T. (2006). The end of the end of ideology. American Psychologist, 61, 651670.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jost, J. T., Basevich, E., Dickson, E. S., & Noorbaloochi, S. (2015). The place of values in a world of politics: Personality, motivation, and ideology. In Brosch, T. & Sander, D. (Eds.), Handbook of value: The affective sciences of values and valuation. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Jost, J. T., Glaser, J., Kruglanski, A. W., & Sulloway, F. J. (2003a). Political conservativism as motivated social cognition. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 339375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jost, J. T., Glaser, J., Kruglanski, A. W., & Sulloway, F. J. (2003b). Exceptions that prove the rule – using a theory of motivated social cognition to account for ideological incongruities and political anomalies: Reply to Greenberg and Jonas (2003). Psychological Bulletin, 129, 383393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jost, J. T., & Thompson, E. P. (2000). Group-based dominance and opposition to equality as independent predictors of self esteem, ethnocentrism, and social policy attitudes among African Americans and European Americans. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 36, 209233.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knight, K. (1985). Ideology in the 1980 election: Ideological sophistication does matter. Journal of Politics, 47, 828853.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knutsen, O. (1995). Party choice. In van Deth, J. W. & Scarbrough, E. (Eds.), The impact of values (pp. 460491). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Knutson, J. (1973) Handbook of political psychology. San Francisco, NC: Jossey Bass.Google Scholar
Krosnick, J. A. (1990). Expertise and political psychology. Social Cognition, 8, 18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lasswell, H. D. (1930). Psychopathology and politics. New York: Viking.Google Scholar
Lasswell, H. D. (1948). Power and personality. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
Lau, R. R. (2003) Models of decision-making. In Sears, D. O., Huddy, L. & Jervis, R. (Eds.), Oxford handbook of political psychology (pp. 1959). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Lau, R. R., & Sears, D. O. (Eds.) (1986). Political cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Lavine, H., Burgess, D., Snyder, M., Transue, J., Sullivan, J., Haney, B., &