Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 2.323 Render date: 2022-05-28T04:28:04.916Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Part I - Foundations for Studying Relationships

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2018

Anita L. Vangelisti
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Daniel Perlman
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Areflli, L. K. (1995). Disciplines at parallel play. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12, 589596.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adams, B. N. (1988). Fifty years of family research: What does it mean? Journal of Marriage and the Family, 50, 517.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Afifi, T. D., Merrill, A. F., & Davis, S. (2016). The theory of resilience and relational load. Personal Relationships, 23, 663683.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Afifi, W. A., & Weiner, J. L. (2004). Toward a theory of motivated information management. Communication Theory, 14, 167190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aronson, E., & Linder, D. (1965). Gain and loss of esteem as determinants of interpersonal attractiveness. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 1, 156171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bahr, S. J. (ed.) (1991). Family research: A sixty-year review, 1930–1990. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
Barbee, A. P. (1990). Interactive coping: The cheering up process in close relationships. In Duck, S. W. (with Cohen, R. S.), (eds.) Personal relationships and social support (pp. 4665). London: Sage.Google Scholar
Barry, W. A. (1970). Marriage research and conflict: An integrative review. Psychological Bulletin, 73, 4154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berger, C. R., & Bradac, J. J. (1982). Language and social knowledge: Uncertainty in interpersonal relationships. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar
Berger, C. R., & Calabrese, R. J. (1975). Some explorations in initial interaction and beyond: Toward a developmental theory of interpersonal communication. Human Communication Research, 1, 99112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E. (1985). Interpersonal attraction. In Lindzey, G. & Aronson, E. (eds.) The handbook of social psychology: Vol. II. Special fields and applications (3rd edn., pp. 413484). New York, NY: Random House.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E. (1994). Interpersonal relationships. Annual Review of Psychology, 45, 79129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E. (1999). The greening of relationship science. American Psychologist, 54, 260266.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berscheid, E., & Hatfield Walster, E. (1978). Interpersonal attraction (2nd edn.). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E., & Peplau, L. A. (1983). The emerging science of relationships. In Kelley, H. H. et al. (eds.) Close relationships (pp. 119). New York, NY: Freeman.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E., & Reis, H. (1998). Attraction and close relationships. In Gilbert, D. T., Fiske, S. T., & Lindzey, G. (eds.) The handbook of social psychology (4th edn., pp. 193281). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Bischoping, K. (1993). Gender differences in conversation topics, 1922–1990. Sex Roles, 28(1–2), 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bochner, A. P. (1984). The functions of communication in interpersonal bonding. In Arnold, C. & Bowers, J. (eds.) The handbook of rhetoric and communication (pp. 544621). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
Bogat, G. A., von Eye, A., & Bergman, L. R. (2016). Person-oriented approaches. In Cicchetti, D. (ed.) Developmental psychopathology: Theory and method (pp. 797845). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.Google Scholar
Bradshaw, S. D. (1998). I’ll go if you will: Do shy persons utilize social surrogates? Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 15, 651669.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Braithwaite, D. O., & Baxter, L. A. (eds.) (2006). Engaging theories in family communication: Multiple perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Brehm, S. S. (1992). Intimate relationships (2nd edn.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Broderick, C. B. (1970). Editorial. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 32, 495.Google Scholar
Broderick, C. B. (1988). To arrive where we started: The field of family studies in the 1930s. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 50, 569584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Broderick, C. B., & Schrader, S. S. (1981). The history of professional marriage and family therapy. In Gurman, A. S. & Kniskern, D. P. (eds.) Handbook of family therapy (pp. 535). New York, NY: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
Bulcroft, R. A., & White, J. M. (1997). Family research methods and levels of analysis. Family Science Review, 10, 136153.Google Scholar
Burleson, B. R. (1990). Comforting as social support: Relational consequences of supportive behaviors. In Duck, S. W. (with Cohen, R. S.) (eds.) Personal relationships and social support (pp. 6682). London: Sage.Google Scholar
Byrne, D. (1961). Interpersonal attraction and attitude similarity. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 62, 713715.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Byrne, D. (1971). The attraction paradigm. New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Byrne, D., & Griffitt, W. (1973). Interpersonal attraction. Annual Review of Psychology, 24, 317336.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, L., Loving, T. J., & LeBel, E. P. (2014). Enhancing transparency of the research process to increase accuracy of findings: A guide for relationship researchers. Personal Relationships, 21, 531545.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooper, M. L., & Sheldon, M. S. (2002). Seventy years of research on personality and close relationships: Substantive and methodological trends over time. Journal of Personality, 70, 783812.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cramer, D. (1998). Close relationships: The study of love and friendship. London: Arnold.Google Scholar
Cupach, W. R., & Spitzberg, B. H. (eds.) (1994). The dark side of interpersonal communication. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Duck, S. W. (1986). Human relationships. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Duck, S. (ed.) (1997). Handbook of personal relationships (2nd edn.). Chichester: John Wiley.Google Scholar
Duck, S. W. (2002). Hypertext in the key of G: Three types of “history” as influences on conversational structure and flow. Communication Theory, 12, 4162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duck, S. W. (2014). On Iowa, relationships, and communication: A history of the field of personal relationships. Iowa Journal of Communication, 45, 515. Retrieved from https://uni.edu/ica/journal/ica_journal/46_1/duck_final_5–15.pdfGoogle Scholar
Duck, S. W., & Gilmour., R. (ed.) (1981a). Personal relationships 1: Studying personal relationships. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Duck, S. W., & Gilmour., R. (ed.) (1981b). Personal relationships 2: Developing personal relationships. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Duck, S. W., & Gilmour., R. (ed.) (1981c). Personal relationships 3: Personal relationships in disorder. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Duck, S., & Perlman, D. (1985). The thousand islands of personal relationships: A prescriptive analysis for future explorations. In Duck, S. & Perlman, D. (eds.) Understanding personal relationships research: An interdisciplinary approach (pp. 115). London: Sage.Google Scholar
Duck, S. W., Rutt, D. J., Hurst, M., & Strejc, H. (1991). Some evident truths about conversations in everyday relationships: All communication is not created equal. Human Communication Research, 18, 228267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duck, S. W., & Sants, H. K. A. (1983). On the origin of the specious: Are personal relationships really interpersonal states? Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 1, 2741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Felmlee, D., & Sprecher, S. (2000). Close relationships and social psychology: Intersections and future paths. Social Psychology Quarterly, 63, 365376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fincham, F. D. (2010). Forgiveness: Integral to a science of close relationships? In Mikulincer, M. & Shaver, P. R. (eds.) Prosocial motives, emotions, and behavior: The better angels of our nature (pp. 347365). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fine, M. A., & Fincham, F. D. (eds.) (2013). Handbook of family theories: A content-based approach. New York, NY: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finkel, E. J. (2016). Reflections on the Commitment–Forgiveness Registered Replication Report. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11, 765767.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Finkel, E. J., & Campbell, W. K. (2001). Self-control and accommodation in close relationships: An interdependence analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 263277. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022–3514.81.2.263CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Finkel, E. J., Simpson, J. A., & Eastwick, P. W. (2017). The psychology of close relationships: Fourteen core principles. Annual Review of Psychology, 68, 383411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fitzsimons, G. M., Finkel, E. J., & Vandellen, M. R. (2015). Transactive goal dynamics. Psychological Review, 122, 648673.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Floyd, K. (2006). Communicating affection: Interpersonal behavior and social context. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fraley, R. C. (2007). Using the Internet for personality research: What can be done, how to do it, and some concerns. In Robins, R. W., Fraley, R. C., & Krueger, R. F. (eds.) Handbook of research methods in personality psychology (pp. 130148). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Gottman, J. M. (1979). Marital interaction: Experimental investigations. New York, NY: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Hendrick, C., & Hendrick, S. S. (eds.) (2000). Close relationships: A sourcebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Higbee, K. L., & Wells, M. G. (1972). Some research trends in social psychology during the 1960s. American Psychologist, 27, 963966.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hinde, R. A. (1979). Towards understanding relationships. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Hinde, R. A. (1997). Relationships: A dialectical perspective. East Sussex: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Hui, C. M., Finkel, E. J., Fitzsimons, G. M., Kumashiro, M., & Hofmann, W. (2014). The Manhattan effect: When relationship commitment fails to promote support for partners’ interests. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106, 546570. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0035493CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huston, T. L., & Levinger, G. (1978). Interpersonal attraction and relationships. Annual Review of Psychology, 29, 115156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Johnson, S. M. (2009). Attachment theory and emotionally focused therapy for individuals and couples. In Obegi, J. H. & Berant, E. (eds.) Attachment theory and research in clinical work with adults (pp. 410433). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kashy, D. A., Campbell, L., & Harris, D. W. (2006). Advances in data analytic approaches for relationships research: The broad utility of hierarchical linear modeling. In Vangelisti, A. L. & Perlman, D. (eds.) The Cambridge handbook of personal relationships (pp. 7389). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaslow, F. W. (2000). Continued evolution of family therapy: The last twenty years. Contemporary Family Therapy, 22, 357386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelley, H. H., Berscheid, E., Christensen, A., Harvey, J. H., Huston, T. L., Levinger, G., McClintock, E., Peplau, L. A., & Peterson, D. R. (1983). Close relationships. New York, NY: Freeman.Google Scholar
Kelley, H. H., Holmes, J. G., Kerr, N. L., Reis, H. T., Rusbult, C. E. & Van Lange, P. A. M. (2003). An atlas of interpersonal situations. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, D. A., & La Voie, L. (1984). The social relations model. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 18, 142182.Google Scholar
Kowalski, R. M. (ed.) (1997). Aversive interpersonal behaviors. New York, NY: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Larson, R., Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Graef, R. (1982). Time alone in daily experience: Loneliness or renewal? In Peplau, L. A. & Perlman, D. (eds.) Loneliness: A sourcebook of current theory, research, and therapy (pp. 4053). New York, NY: Wiley-Interscience.Google Scholar
Levinger, G. (1976). A social psychological perspective on marital dissolution. Journal of Social Issues, 32(1), 2147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lott, A. J., & Lott, B. E. (1974). The role of reward in the formation of positive interpersonal attitudes. In Huston, T. L. (ed.) Foundations of interpersonal attraction (pp. 171192). New York, NY: Academic Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyons, R., Sullivan, M., Ritvo, P., & Coyne, J. (1995). Relationships in chronic illness and disability. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Malloy, T. E., & Kenny, D. A. (1986). The Social Relations Model: An integrative method for personality research. Journal of Personality, 54, 199225. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467–6494.1986.tb00393.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Metts, S. (2000). Face and facework: Implications for the study of personal relationships. In Dindia, K. & Duck, S. W. (eds.) Communication and personal relationships (pp. 7294). Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
Mikulincer, M., & Shaver, P. R. (2007). Attachment in adulthood: Structure, dynamics, and change. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Mikulincer, M., & Shaver, P. R. (2016). Attachment in adulthood: Structure, dynamics, and change (2nd edn.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Murray, S. L., Holmes, J. G., & Collins, N. L. (2006). Optimizing assurance: The risk regulation system in relationships. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 641666. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0033–2909.132.5.641CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Newcomb, T. M. (1956). The prediction of interpersonal attraction. American Psychologist, 11, 575586.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newcomb, T. M. (1961). The acquaintance process. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nosek, B. A., Alter, G., Banks, G. C., Borsboom, D., Bowman, S. D., Breckler, S. J., … & Contestabile, M. (2015). Promoting an open research culture. Science, 348(6242), 14221425.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nye, F. I. (1988). Fifty years of family research: 1937–1978. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 50, 305316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olson, D. H. (1977). Insiders’ and outsiders’ views of relationships: Research studies. In Levinger, G. & Rausch, H. (eds.) Close relationships: Perspectives on the meaning of intimacy (pp. 115135). Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press.Google Scholar
Overall, N. C., & Simpson, J. A. (2013). Regulation processes in close relationships. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 427451). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Perlman, D. (2009). Disciplines contributing to relationship science. In Reis, H. T. & Sprecher, S. (eds.) Encyclopedia of human relationships (pp. 13491353). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Perlman, D., & Duck, S. (2006). The seven seas of the study of personal relationships: From “the thousand islands” to interconnected waterways. In Vangelisti, A. L. & Perlman, D. (eds.) The Cambridge handbook of personal relationships (pp. 1134). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rawlins, W. K. (1992). Friendship matters: Communication, dialectics, and the life course. New York, NY: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T. (2007). Steps toward the ripening of relationship science. Personal Relationships, 14, 123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T. (2012). A history of relationship research in social psychology. In Kruglanski, A. W. & Stroebe, W. (eds.) Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 363382). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T., Aron, A., Clark, M. S., & Finkel, E. J. (2013). Ellen Berscheid, Elaine Hatfield, and the emergence of relationship science. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 8, 558572.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T., & Shaver, P. (1988). Intimacy as an interpersonal process. In Duck, S. (ed.) Handbook of personal relationships (pp. 367389). Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T., Sheldon, K. M., Gable, S. L., Roscoe, J., & Ryan, R. M. (2000). Daily well-being: The role of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 419435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T., & Wheeler, L. (1991). Studying social interaction with the Rochester Interaction Record. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 24, 269318.Google Scholar
Rempel, J. K., Holmes, J. G., & Zanna, M. P. (1985). Trust in close relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 95112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rohlfing, M. (1995). “Doesn’t anybody stay in one place any more?” An exploration of the understudied phenomenon of long-distance relationships. In Wood, J. T. & Duck, S. W. (eds.) Under-studied relationships: Off the beaten track [Vol. 6. Understanding relationship processes] (pp. 173196). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Rubin, Z. (1973). Liking and loving: An invitation to social psychology. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.Google Scholar
Rusbult, C. E. (1987). Responses to dissatisfaction in close relationships: The exit-voice-loyalty-neglect model. In Perlman, D. & Duck, S. (eds.) Intimate relationships: Development, dynamics, and deterioration (pp. 209237). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Agnew, C. R., & Arriaga, X. B. (2012). The Investment Model of Commitment Processes. In Van Lange, P. A. M., Kruglanski, A. W., & Higgins, E. T. (eds.) Handbook of theories of social psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 218231). Los Angeles, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Finkel, E. J., & Kumashiro, M. (2009). The Michelangelo phenomenon. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18, 305309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rutter, V., & Schwartz, P. (1998). The love test: Romance and relationship self-quizzes developed by psychologists and sociologists. New York, NY: Berkley.Google Scholar
Sears, D. O. (1986). College sophomores in the laboratory: Influences of a narrow data base on social psychology’s view of human nature. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51, 515530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shebilske, L., & Huston, T. (Organizers). (1996). Designing and carrying out a longitudinal study of relationships: Lessons from the Pair Project. Workshop presented at the meeting of the International Society for the Study of Personal Relationships, Banff, Canada.Google Scholar
Simpson, J. A. (2007). Psychological foundations of trust. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16, 264268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Solomon, D. H., & Knobloch, L. K. (2004). A model of relational turbulence: The role of intimacy, relational uncertainty, and interference from partners in appraisals of irritations. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 21, 795816.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spitzberg, B. H., & Cupach, W. R. (eds.) (1998). The dark side of close relationships. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Stafford, L. (2004). Maintaining long-distance and cross-residential relationships. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Sunnafrank, M. (1983). Attitude similarity and interpersonal attraction in communication processes: In pursuit of an ephemeral influence. Communication Monographs, 50, 273284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Surra, C. A. (1985). Courtship types: Variations in interdependence between partners and social networks. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 357375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Surra, C. A., & Ridley, C. (1991). Multiple perspectives on interaction: Participants, peers, and observers. In Montgomery, B. M. & Duck, S. W. (eds.) Studying interpersonal interaction (pp. 3555). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Tharp, R. G. (1963). Psychological patterning in marriage. Psychological Bulletin, 60, 97117.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Lange, P. A. M., Kruglanski, A. W., & Higgins, E. T. (eds.) (2012). Handbook of theories of social psychology (Vol. 2). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Vangelisti, A. L. (1994). Messages that hurt. In Cupach, W. R. & Spitzberg, B. H. (eds.) The dark side of communication (pp. 5382). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Weber, A. L., & Harvey, J. H. (eds.) (1994). Perspectives on close relationships. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
White, J. M., Klein, D. M., & Martin, T. F. (2015). Family theories: An introduction. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Winch, R. F. (1958). Mate-selection: A study of complementary needs. Oxford: Harper.Google Scholar
Agnew, C. R., & Le, B. (2015). Prosocial behavior in close relationships: An interdependence approach. In Schroeder, D. A. & Graziano, W. G. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of prosocial behavior (pp. 362375). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ainsworth, M. D. S., & Bell, S. M. (1970). Attachment, exploration, and separation: Illustrated by the behavior of one-year-olds in a strange situation. Child Development, 41, 4967.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andersen, S. M., & Chen, S. (2002). The relational self: An interpersonal social-cognitive theory. Psychological Review, 109, 619645.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andersen, S. M., Glassman, N. S., Chen, S., & Cole, S. W. (1995). Transference in social perception: The role of chronic accessibility in significant-other representations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 4157.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aron, A., Lewandowski, G. W., Mashek, D., & Aron, E. N. (2014). The self-expansion model of motivation and cognition in close relationships. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 90115). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Arriaga, X. B. (2013). An interdependence theory analysis of close relationships. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 3965). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Arriaga, X. B., & Agnew, C. R. (2001). Being committed: Affective, cognitive, and conative components of relationship commitment. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27, 11901203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bauman, C. W., McGraw, A. P., Bartels, D. M., & Warren, C. (2014). Revisiting external validity: Concerns about trolley problems and other sacrificial dilemmas in moral psychology. Social and Personality Compass. doi: 10.1111/spc3.12131CrossRef
Baumard, N., André, J. B., & Sperber, D. (2013). A mutualistic approach to morality: The evolution of fairness by partner choice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 36, 5978.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beckes, L., & Coan, J. A. (2011). Social baseline theory: The role of social proximity in emotion and economy of action. Social and Personality Compass. doi: 10.111/j.1751–9004.2011.00400CrossRef
Berscheid, E. (1986). Mea culpas and lamentations: Sir Francis, Sir Isaac, and the slow progress of soft psychology. In Gilmour, R. & Duck, S. (eds.) The emerging field of personal relationships (pp. 267286). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E. (1995). Help wanted: A grand theorist of interpersonal relationships, sociologist or anthropologists preferred. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12, 529533.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E. (1999a). The greening of relationship science. American Psychologist, 54, 260266.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berscheid, E. (1999b). Integrating relationship knowledge. In Collins, A. W. & Laursen, B. (eds.) Relationships as developmental contexts (pp. 307314). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E. (2003). The human’s greatest strength: Other humans. In Aspinwall, L. G. & Staudinger, U. M. (eds.) A psychology of human strengths: Fundamental questions and future directions for a positive psychology (pp. 3747). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E., & Collins, A. W. (2000). Who cares? For whom and when, how, and why? Psychological Inquiry, 11, 107109.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E., & Peplau, L. A. (1983). The emerging science of relationships. In Kelley, H. H., Berscheid, E., Christensen, A., Harvey, J. H., Huston, T. L., Levinger, G., McClintock, E., Peplau, L. A., & Peterson, D. R. (eds.) Close relationships (pp. 119). New York, NY: Freeman.Google Scholar
Berscheid, E., Snyder, M., & Omoto, A. M. (1989). The Relationship Closeness Inventory: Assessing the closeness of interpersonal relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57, 792.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bolger, N., & Amarel, D. (2007). Effects of social support visibility on adjustment to stress: Experimental evidence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92, 458475.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bolger, N., Zuckerman, A., & Kessler, R. C. (2000). Invisible support and adjustment to stress. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 953961.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boothby, E. J., Clark, M. S., & Bargh, J. A. (2014). Shared experiences are amplified. Psychological Science, 25, 22092216. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797614551162CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boothby, E. J., Smith, L. K., Clark, M. S., & Bargh, J. A. (2016). Psychological distance moderates the amplification of shared experience. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42(10), 14311444. doi: 10.1177/0146167216662869CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boothby, E. J., Smith, L. K., Clark, M. S., & Bargh, J. A. (2017). The world looks better together: How close others enhance our visual experiences. Personal Relationships. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/pere.12201CrossRef
Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss: Vol. 1. Attachment. New York, NY: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Bowlby, J. (1973). Attachment and loss: Vol. 2. Separation: Anxiety and anger. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
Bowlby, J. (1979). The making and breaking of affectional bonds. London: Tavistock Publications.Google Scholar
Bowlby, J. (1980). Attachment and loss: Vol. 3. Sadness and depression. New York, NY: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Bradbury, T. N., & Karney, B. R. (2014). Intimate relationships (2nd edn.). New York, NY: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
Brosch, T., Sander, D., & Scherer, K. R. (2007). The baby caught my eye: Attention capture by infant faces. Emotion, 7, 685689.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bugental, D. B. (2000). Acquisition of the algorithms of social life: A domain based approach. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 187219.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M. (1995). Evolutionary psychology: A new paradigm for psychological science. Psychological Inquiry, 6, 130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, L., & Simpson, J. A. (2013). The blossoming of relationship science. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 310). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Campbell, L., & Surra, C. (2012). Research on close relationships: Call for an interdisciplinary integration. In. Campbell, L. & Loving, T. J. (eds.) Interdisciplinary research on close relationships: The case for integration (pp. 324). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cavallo, J. V., Murray, S. L., & Holmes, J. G. (2014). Risk regulation in close relationships. In Mikulincer, M. & Shaver, P. R. (eds.) Mechanisms of social connection: From brain to group (pp. 237254). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, S., Boucher, H., Andersen, S. M., & Saribay, S. A. (2014). Transference and the relational self. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 281305). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Clark, M. S., & Boothby, E. (2013). A strange(r) analysis of morality: A consideration of relational context and the broader literature is needed. Brain and Behavioral Sciences, 36, 8586. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X12000751CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark, M. S., Boothby, E. J., Clark-Polner, E., & Reis, H. T. (2015). Understanding prosocial behavior requires understanding relational context. In Schroeder, D. A. & Graziano, W. G. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of prosocial behavior (pp. 329245). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Clark, M. S., & Lemay, E. P. Jr. (2010). Close relationships. In Fiske, S. T., Gilbert, D. T., & Gardner, L. (eds.) Handbook of social psychology (Vol. 2, 5th edn., pp. 898940). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Clark, M. S., Lemay, E. P., & Reis, H. T. (2018, in press). Other people as situations: Relational context shapes psychological phenomena. In Rauthmann, J. F., Sherman, R., & Funder, D. C. (eds.), The Oxford handbook of situations. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Advanced online publication.Google Scholar
Clark, M. S., & Mills, J. (1979). Interpersonal attraction in exchange and communal relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 1224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, M. S., & Mills, J. R. (2012). A theory of communal (and exchange) relationships. In van Lange, P. A. M., Kruglanski, A. W., & Higgins, E. T. (eds.) Handbook of theories of social psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 232250). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, M. S., Ouellette, R., Powell, M. C., & Milberg, S. (1987). Recipient’s mood, relationship type, and helping. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 53, 94103.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark-Polner, E., & Clark, M. S. (2014). Understanding and accounting for relational context is critical for social neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8, 127. http://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00127CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cushman, F., Young, L., & Greene, J. D. (2010). Our multi-system moral psychology. Towards a consensus view. In Doris, J. and the Moral Psychology Research Group (eds.) The moral psychology handbook (pp. 4771). London: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Downey, G., & Feldman, S. I. (1996). Implications of rejection sensitivity for intimate relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70, 13271343.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eibach, R. P., Libby, L. K., & Erlinger, J. (2012). Unrecognized changes in the self contribute to exaggerated judgments of external decline. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 34, 193203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eibach, R. P., Libby, L. K., & Gilovich, T. D. (2003). When change in the self is mistaken for change in the world. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 917931.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eibach, R. P., & Mock, S. E. (2011). The vigilant parent: Parental role salience affects parents’ risk perceptions, risk-aversion, and trust in strangers. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47, 694697.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Feeney, B. C., & Collins, N. L. (2015). A new look at social support: A theoretical perspective on thriving through relationships. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 19, 113147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fessler, D. M. T., & Holbrook, C. (2013). Friends shrink foes: The presence of comrades decreases the envisioned physical formidability of an opponent. Psychological Science, 24, 797802.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fessler, D. M. T., Holbrook, C., Pollack, J. S., & Hahn-Holbrook, J. (2014). Stranger danger: Parenthood increases the envisioned bodily formidability of menacing men. Evolution and Human Behavior, 35, 109117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finkel, E. J. (2014). The I3 model: Metatheory, theory and evidence. In Olson, J. M. & Zanna, M. (eds.) Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 49, pp. 1104). San Diego, CA: Elsevier Academic Press.Google Scholar
Finkel, E. J., & Rusbult, C. E. (2008). Pro-relationship motivation: An interdependence theory analysis of situations with conflicting interests. In Shah, J. Y. & Gardener, W. L. (eds.) Handbook of motivation science (pp. 547560). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Finkel, E. J., Simpson, J. A., & Eastwick, P. W. (2017). The psychology of close relationships: Fourteen core principles. Annual Review of Psychology, 68, 383411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fiske, A. P. (1992). The four elementary forms of sociality: Framework for a unified theory of social relations. Psychological Review, 99, 689723.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fletcher, G. J. O., Simpson, J., Campbell, L., & Overall, N. C. (2013). The science of intimate relationships. Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Fraley, R. C., Waller, N. G., & Brennan, K. A. (2000). An item-response theory analysis of self-report measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 350365.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gable, S. L., Reis, H. T., Impett, E. A., & Asher, E. R. (2004). What do you do when things go right? The intrapersonal and interpersonal benefits of sharing positive events. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 87, 228245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greenwall, A. G., & Farnham, S. D. (2000). Using the implicit association test to measure self-esteem and self-concept. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 10221038.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haselton, M. G., & Galperin, A. (2013). Error management in relationships. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 234254). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hazan, C., & Shaver, P. (1987). Romantic love conceptualized as an attachment process. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 511.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Holmes, J. G. (2012). The future of relationship science. In Campbell, L., La Guardia, J. G., Olson, J. M., & Zanna, M. P. (eds.), The Ontario symposium on personality and social psychology: Vol. 12. The science of the couple (pp. 231253). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Holt-Lunstad, J., Smith, T. B., & Layton, J. B. (2010). Social relationships and mortality risk: A meta-analytic review. PLOS Med. 7:e1000316. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000316CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huston, T. L., & Vangelisti, A. L. (1995). How parenthood changes marriage. In Fitzpatrick, M. A. & Vangelisti, A. L. (eds.) Explaining family interactions (pp. 147176). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ickes, W., & Hodges, S. D. (2013). Empathic accuracy in close relationships. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 348373). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Julian, L. J. (2011). Measures of anxiety: State‐Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale‐Anxiety (HADS‐A). Arthritis Care & Research, 63(S11), s467s472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karandashev, V. (2016). Romantic love in cultural context. New York, NY: Springer.Google Scholar
Karney, B. R., & Bradbury, T. N. (1995). The longitudinal course of marital quality and stability: A review of theory, methods, and research. Psychological Bulletin, 118, 334.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Karney, B. R., & Bradbury, T. N. (2005). Contextual influences on marriage: Implications for policy and intervention. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 14(4), 171174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelley, H. H. (1979). Personal relationships: Their structures and processes. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Kelley, H. H., Berscheid, E., Christensen, A., Harvey, J. H., Huston, T. L., Levinger, G., McClintock, E., Peplau, L. A., & Peterson, D. R. (eds.) (1983). Close relationships. New York, NY: Freeman.Google Scholar
Kelley, H. H., Holmes, J. G., Kerr, N., Reis, H., Rusbult, C., & Van Lange, P. A. (2003). An atlas of interpersonal situations. Cambridge: Cambridge Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kelley, H. H., & Thibaut, J. W. (1978). Interpersonal relations: A theory of interdependence. New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Kenrick, D. T., & Cohen, A. B. (2012). A history of evolutionary social psychology. In Kruglanski, A. W. & Stroebe, W. (eds.) Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 101122). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Kenrick, D. T., Neuberg, S. L., & White, A. E. (2013). Relationships from an evolutionary life history perspective. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 1338). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Knapp, M. L., Vangelisti, A. L., & Caughlin, J. P. (2013). Interpersonal communication and human relationships (7th edn.). New York, NY: Pearson Higher Education.Google Scholar
Knee, C. R., & Petty, K. N. (2013). Implicit theories of relationships: Destiny and growth beliefs. In Simpson, J. A. & Campbell, L. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of close relationships (pp. 183198). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Krems, J. A., Neel, R., Neuberg, S. L., Puts, D. A., & Kenrick, D. T. (2016). Women selectively guard their (desirable) mates from ovulating women. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 110, 551573.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Langlois, J. H., Kalakanis, L., Rubenstein, A. J., Larson, A., Hallam, M., & Smoot, M. (2000). Maxims or myths of beauty? A meta-analytic and theoretical review. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 390423.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Luchies, L. B., Finkel, E. J., McNulty, J. K., & Kumashiro, M. (2010). The doormat effect: When forgiving erodes self-respect and self-concept clarity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 98, 734749.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maner, J. K., Gailliot, M. T., Rouby, D. A., & Miller, S. L. (2007). Can’t take my eyes off you: Attentional adhesion to mates and rivals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93, 389401.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maner, J. K., Rouby, D. A., & Gonzaga, G. C. (2008). Automatic inattention to attractive alternatives: The evolved psychology of relationship maintenance. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29, 343349.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maner, J. K., & Shackelford, T. K. (2008). The basic cognition of jealousy: An evolutionary perspective. European Journal of Personality, 22, 3136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martin, L. J., Hathaway, G., Labester, K., Mirali, S., Acland, E. L., Niederstrasser, N., … Mogil, J. S. (2015). Reducing social stress elicits emotional contagion of pain in mouse and human strangers. Current Biology, 25, 17.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McNulty, J. (2010). Forgiveness increases the likelihood of subsequent partner transgressions in marriage. Journal of Family Psychology, 24, 787790.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McNulty, J. K. & Russell, V. M. (2016). Forgive and forget, or forgive and regret? Whether Forgiveness leads to less or more offending depends on offender agreeableness. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42, 616631.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mikulincer, M., & Shaver, P. (2007). Attachment in adulthood: Structure, dynamics, and change. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Mikulincer, M., & Shaver, P. R. (2016). Attachment in adulthood: Structure, dynamics and change (2nd edn.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Miller, R. S. (2015). Intimate relationships (7th edn.). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Murray, S. L., & Holmes, J. G. (2009). The architecture of interdependent minds: A motivation-management theory of mutual responsiveness. Psychological Review, 116, 908928.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murray, S. L., & Holmes, J. G. (2011). Interdependent minds: The dynamics of close relationships. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Murray, S. L., Holmes, J. G., & Collins, N. L. (2006). Optimizing assurance: The risk regulation system in relationships. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 641666.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Neel, R., Kenrick, D. T., White, A. E., & Neuberg, S. L. (2016). Individual differences in fundamental social motives. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 110, 887907.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Neuberg, S. L., Kenrick, D. T., & Schaller, M. (2010). Evolutionary social psychology. In Fiske, S. T., Gilbert, D., & Lindzey, G. (eds.) Handbook of social psychology (pp. 761796). New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Pataki, S. P., Fathelbab, S., Clark, M. S., & Malinowski, C. H. (2013). Communal strength norms in the United States and Egypt. Interpersona: An International Journal on Personal Relationships, 7, 7787.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T. (2006). The relationship context of social psychology. In van Lange, P. A. M. (ed.) Bridging social psychology (pp. 253260). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T. (2007). Steps toward the ripening of relationship science. Personal Relationships, 14, 123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T. (2009). Relationships are situations, and situations involve relationships. Journal of Research in Personality, 43, 266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T. (2012). A brief history of relationship research in social psychology. In Kruglanski, A. W. & Stroebe, W. (eds.) Handbook of the history of social psychology (pp. 363382). New York, NY: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T., & Arriaga, X. B. (2015). Interdependence and related theories. In Gawronski, B. & Bodenhausen, G. V. (eds.) Theory and explanation in social psychology (pp. 305327). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T., Clark, M. S., & Holmes, J. G. (2004). Perceived partner responsiveness as an organizing construct in the study of intimacy and closeness. In Mashek, D. J. & Aron, A. (eds.) Handbook of closeness and intimacy (pp. 201225). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T., Collins, W. A., & Berscheid, E. (2000). The relationship context of human behavior and development. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 844872.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reis, H. T., & Shaver, P. R. (1988). Intimacy as an interpersonal process. In Duck, S. (ed.) Handbook of research in personal relationships (pp. 367389). London: Wiley.Google Scholar
Rogers, L. O., Niwa, E. Y., & Way, N. (2017). The friendships of racial-ethnic minority youth in context. In Cabrera, N. J. & Levendecker, B. (eds.) Handbook of positive development of minor youth (pp. 267280), New York, NY: Springer Science & Business Media.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosenberg, M. (1965). Society and the adolescent self-image. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E. (1983). A longitudinal test of the investment model: The development (and deterioration) of satisfaction and commitment in heterosexual involvements. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 45, 101117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Agnew, C. R., & Arriaga, X. B. (2012). The investment model of commitment processes. In van Lange, P. A. M., Kruglanski, A. W., & Higgins, E. T. (eds.) Handbook of theories of social psychology (pp. 218231). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Hannon, P. A., Stocker, S. L., & Finkel, E. J. (2005). Forgiveness and relational repair. In Worthington, E. L. Jr. (ed.) Handbook of forgiveness (pp. 185205). New York, NY: Brunner-Routledge.Google Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., Martz, J. M., & Agnew, C. R. (1998). The investment model scale: Measuring commitment level, satisfaction level, quality of alternatives, and investment size. Personal Relationships, 5, 357387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salovey, P., & Rodin, J. (1984). Some antecedents and consequences of social-comparison jealousy. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 47, 780792.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarkisian, N., & Gerstel, N. (2016). Does singlehood isolate or integrate? Examining the link between marital status and ties to kin, friends, and neighbors. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 33, 361384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schnall, S., Harber, K. D., Stefanucci, J. K., & Proffitt, D. R. (2008). Social support and the perception of geographical slant. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 12461255.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sherman, G. D., Haidt, J., & Coan, J. A. (2009). Viewing cute images increases behavioral carefulness. Emotion, 9, 282.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Simpson, J. A. (2017). Evolution and relationships: The integration continues. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 11, 212219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snyder, M., Tanke, E. D., & Berscheid, E. (1977). Social perception and interpersonal behavior: On the self-fulfilling nature of social stereotypes. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 35, 656666.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tesser, A. (1988). Toward a self-evaluation maintenance model of social behavior. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 21, 181227.Google Scholar
Tesser, A., & Smith, J. (1980). Some effects of task relevance and friendship on helping: You don’t always help the one you like. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 16, 582590.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thibaut, J., & Kelley, H. H. (1959). The social psychology of groups. New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Thomson, J. J. (1985). The trolley problem. Yale Law Journal, 94, 13951415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Lange, P. A. M., & Rusbult, C. R. (2012). Interdependence theory. In van Lange, P. A. M., Kruglanski, A. W., & Higgins, E. T. (eds.) Handbook of theories of social psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 251272). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williamson, G. M., & Clark, M. S. (1989). Providing help and desired relationship type as determinants of changes in moods and self-evaluations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 56, 722734.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zebrowitz, L. A., Brownlow, S., & Olson, K. (1992). Baby talk to the babyfaced. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 16, 143158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beck, L. A., Pietromonaco, P. R., DeBuse, C. J., Powers, S. I., & Sayer, A. G. (2013). Spouses’ attachment pairings predict neuroendocrine, behavioral, and psychological responses to marital conflict. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105, 388424. doi: 10.1037/a0033056CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Betts, L. R., Rotenberg, K. J., Trueman, M., & Stiller, J. (2012). Examining the components of children’s peer liking as antecedents of school adjustment. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 30, 303325.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Borelli, J. L., Sbarra, D. A., Randall, A. K., Snavely, J. E., St. John, H. K., & Ruiz, S. K. (2013). Linguistic indicators of wives’ attachment security and communal orientation during military deployment. Family Process, 52, 535554. doi: 10.1111/famp.12031CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Borelli, J. L., West, J. L., Weekes, N. Y., & Crowley, M. J. (2014). Dismissing child attachment and discordance for subjective and neuroendocrine responses to vulnerability. Developmental Psychobiology, 56, 584591.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Call, V. R. A. (1990). Respondent cooperation and requests for contacts in longitudinal research: A national survey of families and households (NSF Working Paper No. 35). University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Demography and Ecology. Retrieved from www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/nsfhwp/nsfh35.pdfGoogle Scholar
Canary, D. J., Cupach, W. R., & Messman, S. J. (1995). Relationship conflict: Conflict in parent–child, friendship, and romantic relationships. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Caspi, A., & Bem, D. J. (1990). Personality continuity and change across the life course. In Pervin, L. A. (ed.) Handbook of personality: Theory and research (pp. 549575). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Clark, M. S. (1985). Implications of relationship type for understanding compatibility. In Ickes, W. (ed.) Compatible and incompatible relationships (pp. 119140). New York, NY: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, M. S., & Mills, J. (1979). Interpersonal attraction in exchange and communal relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 1224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooper, M. L., & Sheldon, M. S. (2002). Seventy years of research on personality and close relationships: Substantive and methodological trends over time. Journal of Personality, 70, 783812.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Creswell, J. W., & Clark, V. L. P. (2007). Designing and conducting mixed methods research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Finkel, E. J., Eastwick, P. W., & Reis, H. T. (2015). Best research practices in psychology: Illustrating epistemological and pragmatic considerations with the case of relationship science. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 108, 275297.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Henrich, J., Heine, S. J., & Norenzayan, A. (2010). The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33(2–3), 6183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holman, T. B., Birch, P. J., Carroll, J. S., Doxey, C., Larson, J. H., & Linford, S. T. (2001). Premarital prediction of marital quality or breakup: Research, theory, and practice. Netherlands: Kluwer Academic.Google Scholar
Holman, T. B., Busby, D. M., & Larson, J. H. (1989). PREParation for marriage [questionnaire]. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University.Google Scholar
Ickes, W. (1983). A basic paradigm for the study of unstructured dyadic interaction. In Reis, H. T. (ed.) New directions for methodology of social and behavioral science: Naturalistic approaches to studying social interaction (pp. 521). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Ickes, W. (1994). Methods of studying close relationships. In Weber, A. L. & Harvey, J. H. (eds.) Perspectives on close relationships (pp. 1844). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
Ickes, W. (2002). Subjective and intersubjective paradigms for the study of social cognition. The New Review of Social Psychology, 1, 112121.Google Scholar
Ickes, W., Bissonnette, V., Garcia, S., & Stinson, L. (1990). Implementing and using the dyadic interaction paradigm. In Hendrick, C. & Clark, M. S. (eds.) Research methods in personality and social psychology (pp. 1644). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Ickes, W., & Tooke, W. (1988). The observational method: Studying the interaction of minds and bodies. In Duck, S. W., Hay, E. D., Hobfoll, S. E., Ickes, W., & Montgomery, B. M. (eds.) Handbook of personal relationships: Theory, research and interventions (pp. 7997). Chichester: Wiley.Google Scholar
Johnson, R. B., & Onwuegbuzie, A. J. (2004). Mixed methods research: A research paradigm whose time has come. Educational Researcher, 33(7), 1426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karraker, A., & Latham, K. (2015). In sickness and in health? Physical illness as a risk factor for marital dissolution later in life. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 56, 420435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, D. A. (1996). Models of non-independence in dyadic research. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 13, 279294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenny, D. A., Kashy, D. A., & Cook, W. L. (2006). Dyadic data analysis. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kramer, A. D., Guillory, J. E., & Hancock, J. T. (2014). Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111, 87888790.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Krause, S., Back, M. D., Egloff, B., & Schmukle, S. C. (2014). Implicit interpersonal attraction in small groups automatically activated evaluations predict actual behavior toward social partners. Social Psychological and Personality Science 5, 671679. doi: 10.1177/1948550613517723CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lavner, J. A., & Bradbury, T. N. (2010). Patterns of change in marital satisfaction over the newlywed years. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 72, 11711187.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Leary, M. R. (2004). Introduction to behavioral research methods (4th edn.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
Lemay, E. P. Jr., Clark, M. S., & Feeney, B. C. (2007). Projection of responsiveness to needs and the construction of satisfying communal relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92, 834853.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Madill, A., & Gough, B. (2008). Qualitative research and its place in psychological science. Psychological Methods, 13, 254271.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maguire, W. J. (1973). The yin and yang of progress in social psychology: Seven koan. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 26, 446456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mehl, M. R., & Robbins, M. L. (2012). Naturalistic observation sampling: The Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR). In Mehl, M. R. & Conner, T. S. (eds.) Handbook of research methods for studying daily life (pp. 176192). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Mook, D. G. (1983). In defense of external invalidity. American Psychologist, 38, 379387.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nosek, B. A., Alter, G., Banks, G. C., Borsboom, D., Bowman, S. D., Breckler, S. J., … & Contestabile, M. (2015). Promoting an open research culture: Author guidelines for journals could help to promote transparency, openness, and reproducibility. Science (New York, NY), 348(6242), 14221425. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aab2374CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oboler, A., Welsh, K., & Cruz, L. (2012). The danger of big data: Social media as computational social science. First Monday, 17(7). doi: 10.5210/fm.v17i7.3993Google Scholar
Paolacci, G., & Chandler, J. (2014). Inside the Turk: Understanding Mechanical Turk as a participant pool. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23, 184188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reis, H. T., Clark, M. S., & Holmes, J. G. (2004). Perceived partner responsiveness as an organizing construct in the study of intimacy and closeness. In Mashek, D. J. & Aron, A. (eds.) Handbook of closeness and intimacy (pp. 201225). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Rusbult, C. E., & Arriaga, X. B. (1997). Interdependence theory. In Duck, S. (ed.) Handbook of personal relationships: Theory, research and interventions (2nd edn., pp. 221250). New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Russell, M. A. (2014). Mining the social web: Data mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, GitHub, and more (2nd edn.), Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media.Google Scholar
Sears, D. O. (1986). College sophomores in the laboratory: Influences of a narrow data base on social psychology’s view of human nature. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51, 515530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaughnessy, J. J., Zechmeister, E. B., & Zechmeister, J. S. (2015). Research methods in psychology (10th edn.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Simpson, J. A., Oriña, M. M., & Ickes, W. (2003). When accuracy hurts, and when it helps: A test of the empathic accuracy model in marital interactions. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 881893.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Snijders, T. A., & Kenny, D. A. (1999). The social relations model for family data: A multilevel approach. Personal Relationships, 6, 471486.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sroufe, L. A., Egeland, B., Carlson, E. A., & Collins, W. A. (2005). The development of the person. New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Biesanz, J. C., Deeb-Sossa, N., Papadakis, A. A., Bollen, K. A., & Curran, P. J. (2004). The role of coding time in estimating and interpreting growth curve models. Psychological Methods, 9, 3052.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bolger, N., & Laurenceau, J. P. (2013). Intensive longitudinal methods. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Bonito, J. A., DeCamp, M. H., & Coffman, M. (2006). Participation, information, and control in small groups: An actor–partner interdependence model. Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice, 10, 1628.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, L., Simpson, J. A., Boldry, J. G., & Kashy, D. (2005). Perceptions of conflict and support in romantic relationships: The role of attachment anxiety. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 510531.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cillessen, A. H. N., Jiang, S. L., West, T. V., & Laszkowski, D. K. (2005). Predictors of dyadic friendship quality in adolescence. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 29, 165172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, R. L., Kenny, D. A., & Ledermann, T. (2015). Moderation in the actor–partner interdependence model. Personal Relationships, 22, 829.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goldberg, A. E., Smith, J. Z., & Kashy, D. A. (2010). Preadoptive factors predicting lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples’ relationship quality across the transition to adoptive parenthood. Journal of Family Psychology, 24, 221232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hox, J. J. (2010). Multilevel analysis: Techniques and applications (2nd edn.). New York, NY: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kashy, D. A., & Donnellan, M. B. (2008). Comparing MLM and SEM approaches to analyzing developmental dyadic data: Growth curve models of hostility in families. In Card, N. A., Selig, J. P., & Little, T. D. (eds.) Modeling dyadic and interdependent data in the developmental and behavioral sciences (pp. 165190). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Kashy, D. A., Donnellan, M. B., Burt, S. A., & McGue, M. (2008). Growth curve models for indistinguishable dyads using multilevel modeling and structural equation modeling: The case of adolescent twins’ conflict with their mothers. Developmental Psychology, 44, 316329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kashy, D. A., & Kenny, D. A. (2000). The analysis of data from dyads and groups. In Reis, H. T. & Judd, C. M. (eds.) Handbook of research methods in social psychology (pp. 451477). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Kenny, D. A., Kashy, D. A., & Bolger, N. (1998). Data analysis in social psychology. In Gilbert, D., Fiske, S., & Lindzey, G. (eds.) The handbook of social psychology (4th edn., Vol 1, pp. 233265). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Kenny, D. A., Kashy, D. A., & Cook, W. L. (2006). Dyadic data analysis. New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Kenny, D. A., & Ledermann, T. (2010). Detecting, measuring, and testing dyadic patterns in the actor–partner interdependence model. Journal of Family Psychology, 24, 359366.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kivlighan, D. M., Gelso, C. J., Ain, S., Hummel, A. M., & Markin, R. D. (2015). The therapist, the client, and the real relationship: An actor–partner interdependence analysis of treatment outcome. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 62, 314320.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kordahji, H., Bar-Kalifa, E., & Rafaeli, E. (2015). Attachment insecurity as a moderator of cardiovascular arousal effects following dyadic support. Journal of Research in Personality, 57, 8999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lambe, L., Mackinnon, S. P., & Stewart, S. H. (2015). Dyadic conflict, drinking to cope, and alcohol-related problems: A psychometric study and longitudinal actor–partner interdependence model. Journal of Family Psychology, 29, 697707.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lawrence, E., Yoon, J., Langer, A., & Ro, E. (2009). Is psychological aggression as detrimental as physical aggression? The independent effects of psychological aggression on depression and anxiety symptoms. Violence and Victims, 24, 2035.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ledermann, T., & Kenny, D. A. (2012). The common fate model for dyadic data: Variations of a theoretically important but underutilized model. Journal of Family Psychology, 26, 140148.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ledermann, T., & Macho, S. (2009). Mediation in dyadic data at the level of the dyads: A structural equation modeling approach. Journal of Family Psychology, 23, 661670.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ledermann, T., Macho, S., & Kenny, D. A. (2011). Assessing mediation in dyadic data using the actor–partner interdependence model. Structural Equation Modeling, 18, 595612.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Livi, S., Alessandri, G., Caprara, G. V., & Pierro, A. (2015). Positivity within teamwork: Cross-level effects of positivity on performance. Personality and Individual Differences, 85, 230235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loeys, T., Cook, W., De Smet, O., Wietzker, A., & Buysse, A. (2014). The actor–partner interdependence model for categorical dyadic data: A user-friendly guide to GEE. Personal Relationships, 21, 225241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loeys, T., & Molenberghs, G. (2013). Modeling actor and partner effects in dyadic data when outcomes are categorical. Psychological Methods, 18, 220236.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Raudenbush, S. W., Brennan, R. T., & Barnett, R. C. (1995). A multivariate hierarchical model for studying psychological change within married couples. Journal of Family Psychology, 9, 167174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Raudenbush, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods (2nd edn.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Reis, H. T., Collins, W., & Berscheid, E. (2000). The relationship context of human behavior and development. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 844872.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robins, R. W., Caspi, A., & Moffitt, T. (2000). Two personalities, one relationship: Both partners’ personality traits shape the quality of their relationship. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 251259.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Snijders, T. A. B., & Bosker, R. J. (2012). Multilevel analysis: An introduction to basic and advanced multilevel modeling (2nd edn.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Spain, S. M., Jackson, J. J., & Edmonds, G. W. (2012). Extending the actor–partner interdependence model for binary outcomes: A multilevel logistic approach. Personal Relationships, 19, 431444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ahrons, C. (1994). The good divorce. New York, NY: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Ainsworth, M. D. S. (1969). Object relations, dependency, and attachment: A theoretical review of the infant–mother relationship. Child Development, 40, 9691025.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of attachment: A psychological study of the strange situation. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Allen, M., & Burrell, N. (1996). Comparing the impact of homosexual and heterosexual parents on children: Meta-analysis of existing research. Journal of Homosexuality, 32, 1935.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Argyle, M., & Henderson, M. (1985). The rules of relationships. In Duck, S. & Perlman, D. (eds.) Understanding personal relationships: An interdisciplinary approach (pp. 6384). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Asendorpf, J. B. (2003). Head‐to‐head comparison of the predictive validity of personality types and dimensions. European Journal of Personality, 17, 327346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bartholomew, K. (1990). Avoidance of intimacy: An attachment perspective. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 7, 147178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumrind, D. (1967). Child care practices anteceding three patterns of preschool behavior. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 75, 4388.Google ScholarPubMed
Baumrind, D. (1971). Current patterns of parental authority. Developmental Psychology Monographs, 4 (Part 2), 99102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E. (1995). Help wanted: A grand theorist of interpersonal relationships, sociologist or anthropologist preferred. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12, 529533.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berscheid, E. (2010). Love in the fourth dimension. Annual Review of Psychology, 61, 125.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Biblarz, T. J., & Stacey, J. (2010). How does the gender of parents matter? Journal of Marriage and Family, 72, 322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss: Vol. 1. Attachment. New York, NY: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Brito, R., Waldzus, S., Sekerdej, M., & Schubert, T. (2011). The contexts and structures of relating to others: How memberships in different types of groups shape the construction of interpersonal relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 28, 406432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burgoon, J. K., & Hale, J. L. (1984). The fundamental topoi of relational communication. Communication Monographs, 51, 173214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, M. S., & Mills, J. (1979). Interpersonal attraction in exchange and communal relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 1223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, O., Luxenburg, A., Dattner, N., & Matz, D. E. (1999). Suitability of divorcing couples for mediation: A suggested typology. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 27, 329344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Collins, L. M., & Lanza, S. T. (2010). Latent class and latent transition analysis: With applications in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
Crouter, A. C., & Manke, B. (1997). Development of a typology of dual-earner families: A window into differences between and within families in relationships, roles, and activities. Journal of Family Psychology, 11, 6275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, K. E., & Todd, M. J. (1985). Assessing friendship: Prototypes, paradigm cases and relationship description. In Duck, S. & Perlman, D. (eds.) Understanding personal relationships: An interdisciplinary approach (pp. 1738). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Dubin, R. (1978). Theory building (2nd edn.). New York, NY: Free Press.Google Scholar
Dunn, J., & Kendrick, C. (1981). Social behavior of young siblings in the family context: Differences between same-sex and different-sex dyads. Child Development, 52, 12651273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fincham, F. D. (2004). Communication in marriage. In Vangelisti, A. L. (ed.) The handbook of family communication (pp. 83103). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Fiske, A. P. (1991). Structures of social life: The four elementary forms of human relations. New York, NY: Free Press.Google Scholar
Fiske, A. P. (1992). The four elementary forms of sociality: Framework for a unified theory of social relations. Psychological Review, 99, 689723.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fiske, A. P. (1993). Social errors in four cultures: Evidence about universal forms of social relations. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 24, 463494.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fiske, A. P. (1995). Social schemata for remembering people: Relationships and person attributes that affect clustering in free recall of acquaintances. Journal of Quantitative Anthropology, 5, 305324.Google Scholar
Fiske, A. P. (2000). Human sociality: Relational models theory overview. Retrieved October 2, 2016, from www.sscnet.ucla.edu/anthro/faculty/fiske/relmodov.htm
Fiske, A. P., & Haslam, N. (1996). Social cognition is thinking about relationships. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 5, 143148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fiske, A. P., & Haslam, N. (1997). The structure of social substitutions: A test of relational models theory. European Journal of Social Psychology, 27, 725729.3.0.CO;2-A>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fiske, A. P., Haslam, N., & Fiske, S. (1991). Confusing one person with another: What errors reveal about the elementary forms of social relations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, 656674.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fitzpatrick, M. A. (1988). Between husbands and wives: Communication in marriage. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Fitzpatrick, M. A., & Koerner, A. F. (2005). Family communication schemata: Effects on children’s resiliency. In Dunwoody, S., Becker, L. B., McLeod, D., & Kosicki, G., (eds.) The evolution of key mass communication concepts: Honoring Jack M. McLeod (pp. 113136). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.Google Scholar
Fitzpatrick, M. A., & Richie, L. D. (1994). Communication schemata within the family: Multiple perspectives on family interaction. Human Communication Research, 20, 275301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foa, U. G., & Foa, E. B. (1974). Societal structures of the mind. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.Google Scholar
Fowers, B. J., & Olson, D. H. (1992). Four types of premarital couples: An empirical typology based on PREPARE. Journal of Family Psychology, 6, 1021.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Furman, W., Simon, V. A., Shaffer, L., & Bouchey, H. A. (2002). Adolescents’ working models and styles for relationships with parents, friends, and romantic partners. Child Development, 73, 241255.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gaines, S. O. (1995). Classifying dating couples: Gender as reflected in traits, roles, and resulting behavior. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 16, 7594.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gelbard, R., Goldman, O., & Spiegler, I. (2007). Investigating diversity of clustering methods: An empirical comparison. Data & Knowledge Engineering, 63, 155166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gibbs, E. D., Teti, D. M., & Bond, L. A. (1987). Infant–sibling communication: Relationships to birth-spacing and cognitive and linguistic development. Infant Behavior and Development, 10, 307323.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gold, D. T. (1989). Sibling relationships in old age: A typology. International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 28, 3454.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gottman, J. M. (1993). The roles of conflict engagement, escalation, and avoidance in marital interaction: A longitudinal view of five types of couples. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61, 615.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gottman, J. M. (1994). What predicts divorce: The relationship between marital process and marital outcomes. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Harrington, C., & Metzler, A. (1997). Are ACOAs different from adult children of dysfunctional families without alcoholism: A look at committed intimate relationships. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 44, 102107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haslam, N. (1994). Mental representation of social relationships: Dimensions, laws, or categories? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 575584.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haslam, N. (1995). Factor structure of social relationships: An examination of relational models and resource exchange theories. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12, 217227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haslam, N. (1999). Taxometric and related methods in relationships research. Personal Relationships, 6, 519534.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haslam, N. (2009). Relationship types and taxonomies. In Reis, H. T. & Sprecher, S. (eds.) Encyclopedia of human relationships (Vol. 3, pp. 13531358). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Haslam, N., & Fiske, A. P. (1992). Implicit relationship prototypes: Investigating five theories of the cognitive organization of social relationships. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 28, 441474.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hazan, C., & Shaver, P. R. (1987). Romantic love conceptualized as an attachment process. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 511524.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hinde, R. A. (1996). Describing relationships. In Aughagen, A. E. & von Salisch, M. (eds.) The diversity of human relationships (pp. 735), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kantor, D., & Lehr, W. (1976). Inside the family. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Kent, P., Jensen, R. K., & Kongsted, A. (2014). A comparison of three clustering methods for finding subgroups in MRI, SMS or clinical data: SPSS Two Step Cluster analysis, Latent Gold and SNOB. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 14, 113.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kerns, K. A. (2000). Types of preschool friendships. Personal Relationships, 7, 311324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kiesler, D. J. (1983). The 1982 interpersonal circle: A taxonomy for complementarity in human transactions. Psychological Review, 90, 185214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kliem, S., Foran, H. M., Beller, J., Hahlweg, K., Stöbel‐Richter, Y., & Brähler, E. (2015). Dimensional latent structure of relationship quality: Results of three representative population samples. Journal of Marriage and Family, 77, 11901201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knapp, M. L. (1978). Social intercourse: From greeting to goodbye. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
Kobak, R. R., & Sceery, A. (1988). Attachment in late adolescence: Working models, affect regulation, and representations of self and others. Child Development, 59, 135146.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Koerner, A. F. (2006). Models of relating-not relationship models: Cognitive representations of relating across interpersonal relationship domains. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 23, 629653.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koerner, A. F., & Cvancara, K. E. (2002). The influence of conformity orientation on communication patterns in family conversations. The Journal of Family Communication, 2, 132152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koerner, A. F., & Fitzpatrick, M. A. (1997). Family type and conflict: The impact of conversation orientation and conformity orientation on conflict in the family. Communication Studies, 48, 5975.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koerner, A. F., & Fitzpatrick, M. A. (2002a). Toward a theory of family communication. Communication Theory, 12, 7091.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koerner, A. F., & Fitzpatrick, M. A. (2002b). Understanding family communication patterns and family functioning: The roles of conversation orientation and conformity orientation. Communication Yearbook, 26, 3769.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koerner, A. F., & Fitzpatrick, M. A. (2002c). You never leave your family in a fight: The impact of families of origins on conflict-behavior in romantic relationships. Communication Studies, 53, 234251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koerner, A. F., & Fitzpatrick, M. A. (2013). Communication in intact families. In Vangelisti, A. L. (ed.) The Routledge handbook of family communication (2nd edn., pp. 129144). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Kressel, K., Jaffee, N., Tuchman, B., Watson, C., & Deutsch, M. (1980). A typology of divorcing couples: Implications for mediation and the divorce process. Family Process, 19, 101116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lamela, D., Figueiredo, B., Bastos, A., & Feinberg, M. (2016). Typologies of post-divorce coparenting and parental well-being, parenting quality and children’s psychological adjustment. Child Psychiatry & Human Development, 47, 716728.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lavee, Y. & Olson, D. H. (1993). Seven types of marriage: Empirical typology based on ENRICH. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 19, 325340.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Leary, T. (1955). The theory and measurement methodology of interpersonal communication, Psychiatry, 18, 147161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maccoby, E. E., & Martin, J. A. (1983). Socialization in the context of the family: Parent–child interaction. In Hetherington, E. (vol. ed.) & Mussen, P. H. (series ed.) Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 4. Socialization, personality, and social development (4th edn., pp. 1101). New York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
Mares, M. L. (1995). The aging family. In Fitzpatrick, M. A. & Vangelisti, A. L. (eds.) Explaining family interaction (pp. 344374). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marwell, G., & Hage, J. (1970). The organization of role-relationships: A systematic description. American Sociological Review, 35, 884900.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McLeod, J. M. & Chaffee, S. H. (1972). The construction of social reality. In Tedeschi, J. (ed.) The social influence process (pp. 5059). Chicago, IL: Aldine-Atherton.Google Scholar
Meehl, P. E. (1995). Bootstraps taxometrics: Solving the classification problem in psychopathology. American Psychologist, 50, 266275.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moos, R. H., & Moos, B. S. (1976). A typology of family environments. Family Process, 15, 357371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murphy, S. O. (1993). Siblings and the new baby: Changing perspectives. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 8, 277288.Google ScholarPubMed
Olson, D. H. (1981). Family typologies: Bridging family research and family therapy. In Filsinger, E. E. & Lewis, R. A. (eds.) Assessing marriage: New behavioral approaches (pp. 7489). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Olson, D. H. (1993). Circumplex model of marital and family systems. In Wals, F. (ed.) Normal family processes (2nd edn.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Olson, D. H. & Fowers, B. J. (1993). Five types of marriage: An empirical typology based on ENRICH. The Family Journal, 3, 196207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parkinson, L. (1987). Separation, divorce, and families. London: Macmillan Education.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parsons, T., & Shils, E. A. (eds.) (1951). Toward a general theory of action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reiss, D. (1981). The family’s construction of reality. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Ritchie, L. D., & Fitzpatrick, M. A. (1990). Family communication patterns: Measuring interpersonal perceptions of interpersonal relationships. Communication Research, 17, 523544.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosenfeld, L. B., Bowen, G. L., & Richman, J. M. (1995). Communication in three types of dual-career marriages. In Fitzpatrick, M. A. & Vangelisti, A. L. (eds.) Explaining family interaction (pp. 257289). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schutz, W. C. (1958). The interpersonal underworld. Palo Alto, CA: Science and Behavior Books.Google Scholar
Shulman, S. (1995). Typology of close friendships, relationship models and friendship reasoning in early adolescence. In Shulman, S. (ed.) Close relationships and socioemotional development (pp. 109127). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
Shulman, S., & Knafo, D. (1997). Balancing closeness and individuality in adolescent close relationships. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 21, 687702.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Slicker, E. K. (1998). Relationship of parenting style to behavioral adjustment in graduating high school seniors [Electronic Version]. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 27, 345372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stewart, R. B., Kozak, A. L., Tingley, L. M., Goddard, J. M., Blake, E. M., & Cassel, W. A. (2001). Adult sibling relationships: Validation of a typology. Personal Relationships, 8, 299324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stewart, R. B., Verbrugge, K. M., & Beilfuss, M. C. (1998). Sibling relationships in early adulthood: A typology. Personal Relationships, 5, 5974.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stocker, C. M., & McHale, S. M. (1992). The nature and family correlates of preadolescents’ perceptions of their sibling relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 9, 179195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stormshak, E. A., Bellanti, C. J., & Bierman, K. L. (1996). The quality of sibling relationships and the development of social competence and behavioral control in aggressive children. Developmental Psychology, 32, 7989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swenson, A. R., Zvonkovic, A. M., Rojas-McWhinney, J., & Gerst, K. N. (2015). A couple analysis of relationship perceptions among couples who face work demands. Personal Relationships, 22, 153171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Toennies, F. (1957). Community and society (Loomis, C. P., trans.) New York, NY: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
VanLear, C. A., Koerner, A. F., & Allen, D. (2006). Relationship typologies. In Vangelisti, A. & Perlman, D. (eds.) The Cambridge handbook of personal relationships (pp. 91111). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vuchinich, S., & Angelelli, J. (1995). Family interaction during problem solving. In Fitzpatrick, M. A. & Vangelisti, A. L. (eds.) Explaining family interaction (pp. 177205). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weingarten, H., & Leas, S. (1987). Levels of marital conflict model: A guide to assessment and intervention. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 58, 407417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weiss, R. S. (1974). The provisions of social relationships. In Rubin, Z. (ed.) Doing unto others: Joining, molding, conforming, helping, loving (pp. 1726). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Weiss, R. S. (1998). A taxonomy of relationships. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 15, 671683.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, J. S., Riggs, S. A., & Kaminski, P. L. (2016). A typology of childhood sibling subsystems that may emerge in abusive family systems. The Family Journal, 24, 378384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zeanah, C. H., Benoit, D., Barton, M., Regan, C., Hirshberg, L. M., & Lipsitt, L. P. (1993). Representations of attachment in mothers and their one-year-old infants. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 32, 278286.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed