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Part XI - Conclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2018

Anita L. Vangelisti
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Daniel Perlman
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Greensboro
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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  • Conclusion
  • Edited by Anita L. Vangelisti, University of Texas, Austin, Daniel Perlman, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • Book: The Cambridge Handbook of Personal Relationships
  • Online publication: 11 June 2018
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  • Conclusion
  • Edited by Anita L. Vangelisti, University of Texas, Austin, Daniel Perlman, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • Book: The Cambridge Handbook of Personal Relationships
  • Online publication: 11 June 2018
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

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  • Conclusion
  • Edited by Anita L. Vangelisti, University of Texas, Austin, Daniel Perlman, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • Book: The Cambridge Handbook of Personal Relationships
  • Online publication: 11 June 2018
Available formats
×