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Part I - Models of Cognitive Aging

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2020

Ayanna K. Thomas
Affiliation:
Tufts University, Massachusetts
Angela Gutchess
Affiliation:
Brandeis University, Massachusetts
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The Cambridge Handbook of Cognitive Aging
A Life Course Perspective
, pp. 3 - 124
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

References

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