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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 March 2019

Glenda R. Carpio
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Harvard University, Massachusetts
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Print publication year: 2019

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References

Primary Sources

Wright, Richard. A Father’s Law. New York: Harper Perennial, 2008.Google Scholar
Wright, Richard. Bright and Morning Star. New York: International Publishers, 1941.Google Scholar
Wright, Richard. Eight Men. Cleveland and New York: World Publishing Company, 1961.Google Scholar
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Wright, Richard. Native Son (The Biography of a Young American): A Play in Ten Scenes. With Green, Paul. New York: Harper, 1941.Google Scholar
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Wright, Richard. Uncle Tom’s Children: Five Long Stories. New York: Harper, 1940.Google Scholar
Wright, Richard. Uncle Tom’s Children: Four Novellas. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1938.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

Wright, Richard. American Hunger. New York: Harper & Row, 1977. A continuation of Black Boy; Wright’s account of his years in Chicago; published posthumously.Google Scholar
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Wright, Richard. “I Bite the Hand That Feed Me.” Atlantic Monthly, CLV (June 1940), 826–828.
Wright, Richard. “I Support the Soviet Union.” Soviet Russia (September 1941), 29.
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Glenda R. Carpio, Harvard University, Massachusetts
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Richard Wright
  • Online publication: 07 March 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108567510.015
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Glenda R. Carpio, Harvard University, Massachusetts
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Richard Wright
  • Online publication: 07 March 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108567510.015
Available formats
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Glenda R. Carpio, Harvard University, Massachusetts
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Richard Wright
  • Online publication: 07 March 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108567510.015
Available formats
×